500+ Best Resume Action Verbs for 2024

Using strong action verbs to describe your achievements and skills will make hiring managers take notice. Find lists of action verbs for different industries, jobs and interviews to add to your resume.

Ami Icanberry
by Ami Icanberry
Published On : May 07, 2024 

What are action verbs?

Resume action verbs are strong, dynamic verbs that describe your achievements, responsibilities and skills when writing your resume, cover letter or CV. These verbs are crucial because they bring life to your resume accomplishments and paint a vivid picture of your professional experiences.

Why are action verbs important?

Adding resume action verbs to your resume and cover letter will:

  1. Showcase your achievements.

    Example: “Increased sales by 30% through targeted marketing campaigns” is much more impactful than “Responsible for marketing campaigns.”

  2. Provide impact.

    Example: “Led a cross-functional team to streamline operations” stands out more than “Worked with team to improve operations.”

  3. Demonstrate skills.

    Example: “Implemented a new customer service protocol resulting in a 40% decrease in client complaints” demonstrates problem-solving and customer service skills.

  4. Mirror what’s outlined in the job description.

    Example: If the job description mentions a resume keyword like “analyzing data,” you might include “Analyzed market trends to inform business strategies” on your resume.

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Echoing action words found in the job description when writing your cover letter and resume will help your application materials pass applicant tracking systems (ATS), which employers use to scan and weed out unqualified candidates.

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240 action verbs to describe skills

Action verbs are valuable for showcasing your skills on a resume, within a cover letter, during a job interview or in any professional setting where you want to emphasize your capabilities and past experiences. Here are examples of action verbs used to describe various skills.

30 action verbs to describe communication

These action verbs can describe the various skills and activities involved in effective communication skills, whether verbal, written, non-verbal, interpersonal or digital.

  • Conveyed
  • Presented
  • Articulated
  • Negotiated
  • Engaged
  • Facilitated
  • Discussed
  • Expressed
  • Conversed
  • Collaborated
  • Interacted
  • Informed
  • Persuaded
  • Listened
  • Clarified
  • Corresponded
  • Advised
  • Consulted
  • Conferred
  • Drafted
  • Transmitted
  • Shared
  • Convinced
  • Liaised
  • Resolved
  • Updated
  • Responded
  • Debated
  • Coordinated
  • Reported

Communication action word examples:

  • Critiqued work of three junior designers.
  • Wrote weekly company newsletter to share project successes.
  • Co-wrote and edited pitches for investors.

30 action verbs to describe customer service

Using action verbs can describe excellent customer service skills, whether in-person interactions, phone conversations or emails.

  • Assisted
  • Supported
  • Resolved
  • Addressed
  • Responded
  • Listened
  • Guided
  • Advised
  • Communicated
  • Interacted
  • Engaged
  • Collaborated
  • Clarified
  • Followed up
  • Anticipated
  • Educated
  • Advocated
  • Solved
  • Empathized
  • Accommodated
  • Facilitated
  • Escalated
  • Acknowledged
  • Delivered
  • Delighted
  • Streamlined
  • Navigated
  • Handled
  • Ensured
  • Exceeded

Customer or client action verb examples:

  • Handled phone calls and assisted customers with service issues.
  • Provided daily quotes and follow-up calls to our business clients.
  • Recommended food items based on dietary restrictions.

30 action verbs to describe computer skills

Using action verbs can effectively convey your expertise and accomplishments when describing your computer skills on a resume or during an interview.

  • Programmed
  • Developed
  • Designed
  • Implemented
  • Maintained
  • Troubleshot
  • Debugged
  • Configured
  • Automated
  • Updated
  • Installed
  • Tested
  • Optimized
  • Integrated
  • Collaborated
  • Analyzed
  • Researched
  • Created
  • Customized
  • Managed
  • Modified
  • Documented
  • Upgraded
  • Supported
  • Scripted
  • Monitored
  • Deployed
  • Assessed
  • Synchronized
  • Developed

Computer action verbs examples:

  • Developed custom web applications using HTML, CSS and JavaScript.
  • Integrated third-party APIs into existing software systems to enhance functionality and improve data accessibility.
  • Configured network infrastructure components, including routers and switches.

30 action verbs to describe teamwork

Check out these action verbs that help convey the teamwork skills and actions involved in collaborating effectively with others toward a common goal.

  • Collaborated
  • Communicated
  • Coordinated
  • Engaged
  • Contributed
  • Supported
  • Assisted
  • Facilitated
  • Partnered
  • Participated
  • Worked alongside
  • Shared
  • Encouraged
  • Integrated
  • Liaised
  • Cooperated
  • Synchronized
  • Built relationships
  • Aligned
  • Fostered
  • United
  • Resolved conflicts
  • Negotiated
  • Supported
  • Empowered
  • Inspired
  • Organized
  • Enabled
  • Promoted
  • Mentored

Teamwork action verb examples:

  • Partnered with other local brands on events and promotions.
  • Collaborated cross-functionally between design and content teams.
  • Contributed and shared ideas during team meetings.

30 action verbs to describe interpersonal skills

This list of action verbs shows how you can effectively highlight your interpersonal skills, demonstrating your ability to communicate, empathize and negotiate.

  • Communicated
  • Engaged
  • Collaborated
  • Empathized
  • Negotiated
  • Persuaded
  • Influenced
  • Built rapport
  • Fostered relationships
  • Supported
  • Respected
  • Adapted
  • Mediated
  • Convinced
  • Encouraged
  • Empowered
  • Coached
  • Counseled
  • Inspired
  • Mentored
  • Facilitated
  • Guided
  • Acknowledged
  • Assisted
  • Clarified
  • Demonstrated
  • Reassured
  • Validated
  • Collaborated

Interpersonal skills action verbs examples:

  • Encouraged clear channels of communication with team members, ensuring understanding of project goals.
  • Demonstrated empathy and understanding when addressing customer concerns.
  • Negotiated win-win solutions in cross-departmental meetings.

30 action verbs to describe research skills

  • Researched
  • Investigated
  • Analyzed
  • Studied
  • Explored
  • Examined
  • Reviewed
  • Synthesized
  • Collected
  • Compiled
  • Documented
  • Evaluated
  • Scrutinized
  • Surveyed
  • Discovered
  • Interpreted
  • Cataloged
  • Assessed
  • Compared
  • Categorized
  • Identified
  • Probed
  • Tracked
  • Verified
  • Tested
  • Documented
  • Validated
  • Gathered
  • Inspected
  • Investigated

Research action verb examples:

  • Surveyed customers to improve service quality.
  • Verified previous peer-review studies.
  • Fact-checked all published data.

30 action verbs to describe analysis or problem-solving

  • Adapted
  • Analyzed
  • Assembled
  • Assessed
  • Audited
  • Brainstormed
  • Clarified
  • Collated
  • Debugged
  • Deduced
  • Discovered
  • Evaluated
  • Examined
  • Forecasted
  • Gathered
  • Identified
  • Inspected
  • Mapped
  • Measured
  • Modeled
  • Observed
  • Quantified
  • Tested
  • Tracked
  • Troubleshot
  • Uncovered
  • Visualized
  • Innovated
  • Negotiated
  • Prioritized

Analysis or problem-solving action verbs:

  • Forecasted and modeled financial data to present to executive stakeholders.
  • Tracked consumer satisfaction ratings from collected website data.
  • Tested and debugged SQL code.

30 action verbs to describe transferable skills

Transferable skills are those versatile abilities and qualities that you retain across various jobs and industries, making them valuable in various career paths and job roles.

  • Adapt
  • Communicate
  • Analyze
  • Collaborate
  • Lead
  • Manage
  • Organize
  • Prioritize
  • Delegate
  • Problem-solved
  • Innovate
  • Learn
  • Teach
  • Train
  • Coach
  • Motivate
  • Negotiate
  • Influence
  • Facilitate
  • Network
  • Research
  • Evaluate
  • Plan
  • Create
  • Synthesize
  • Implement
  • Improve
  • Support
  • Foster
  • Develop

Transferable skills actions verbs examples:

  • Delegated tasks to team members based on their strengths and expertise.
  • Synthesized data from multiple sources to create comprehensive market reports.
  • Trained new employees, ensuring a smooth onboarding process and adherence to company policies.

200 action verbs for top jobs

50 action verbs for jobs in sales

Using strong action verbs in sales jobs can make your accomplishments and contributions more impactful and memorable, demonstrating your ability to work toward and achieve sales targets.

  • Achieve
  • Acquire
  • Advise
  • Analyze
  • Assist
  • Build
  • Capture
  • Close
  • Collaborate
  • Convert
  • Cultivate
  • Develop
  • Drive
  • Educate
  • Engage
  • Establish
  • Expand
  • Generate
  • Grow
  • Identify
  • Influence
  • Lead
  • Manage
  • Maximize
  • Meet
  • Negotiate
  • Nurture
  • Obtain
  • Overcome
  • Persuade
  • Pitch
  • Present
  • Promote
  • Prospect
  • Provide
  • Qualify
  • Reach
  • Recommend
  • Retain
  • Secure
  • Sell
  • Strategize
  • Support
  • Target
  • Train
  • Transform
  • Upsell
  • Win
  • Yield
  • Close

50 action verbs for accountants

Emphasize your mathematical abilities and expertise in balancing budgets and managing spreadsheets with these action verbs for accountant jobs.

  • Analyze
  • Audit
  • Calculate
  • Classify
  • Compile
  • Compute
  • Confirm
  • Consolidate
  • Create
  • Detect
  • Develop
  • Document
  • Evaluate
  • Examine
  • Forecast
  • Identify
  • Implement
  • Improve
  • Interpret
  • Investigate
  • Maintain
  • Manage
  • Monitor
  • Prepare
  • Process
  • Recommend
  • Reconcile
  • Record
  • Report
  • Review
  • Revise
  • Scrutinize
  • Streamline
  • Supervise
  • Support
  • Track
  • Validate
  • Verify
  • Budget
  • Forecast
  • Allocate
  • Assess
  • Advise
  • Automate
  • Budget
  • Forecast
  • Project
  • Streamline
  • Strategize
  • Tax Plan

50 action verbs for teachers

Use the following teacher action verbs to highlight your ability to convey information clearly and effectively to students of varying ages and backgrounds.

  • Adapt
  • Assess
  • Assist
  • Collaborate
  • Communicate
  • Create
  • Demonstrate
  • Design
  • Develop
  • Differentiate
  • Educate
  • Engage
  • Evaluate
  • Facilitate
  • Foster
  • Guide
  • Implement
  • Inspire
  • Instruct
  • Lead
  • Learn
  • Listen
  • Manage
  • Mentor
  • Model
  • Motivate
  • Nurture
  • Observe
  • Organize
  • Participate
  • Plan
  • Prepare
  • Promote
  • Provide
  • Question
  • Reinforce
  • Respond
  • Review
  • Scaffold
  • Share
  • Stimulate
  • Support
  • Teach
  • Test
  • Transform
  • Tutor
  • Understand
  • Utilize
  • Verify
  • Volunteer

50 action verbs for designers

Designer job titles include graphic designer, web designer, interior designer, fashion designer, industrial designer and more. Use these action verbs to describe how you create visual concepts, products and experiences.

  • Create
  • Design
  • Develop
  • Conceptualize
  • Illustrate
  • Generate
  • Innovate
  • Craft
  • Customize
  • Implement
  • Execute
  • Prototype
  • Refine
  • Sketch
  • Model
  • Render
  • Draft
  • Construct
  • Visualize
  • Collaborate
  • Communicate
  • Present
  • Iterate
  • Experiment
  • Explore
  • Analyze
  • Solve
  • Transform
  • Enhance
  • Revise
  • Brand
  • Style
  • Incorporate
  • Optimize
  • Adapt
  • Integrate
  • Organize
  • Streamline
  • Revamp
  • Redesign
  • Refresh
  • Update
  • Reimagine
  • Personalize
  • Craft
  • Layout
  • Typography
  • Concept
  • Coordinate
  • Inspire

80 action verbs for top industries

20 action verbs for the management industry

Consider these action verbs to describe the various responsibilities and skills involved in management jobs, such as team leadership, project management, resource allocation and strategic planning.

  • Advised
  • Assigned
  • Authorized
  • Chaired
  • Coached
  • Cultivated
  • Delegated
  • Directed
  • Dispatched
  • Enabled
  • Encouraged
  • Enforced
  • Entrusted
  • Executed
  • Facilitated
  • Fostered
  • Guided
  • Headed
  • Hired
  • Hosted

20 action verbs for the education industry

These action verbs can describe various roles and responsibilities within education jobs, such as teaching jobs, curriculum development and student support.

  • Instructed
  • Taught
  • Facilitated
  • Educated
  • Guided
  • Developed
  • Mentored
  • Coached
  • Advised
  • Evaluated
  • Designed
  • Implemented
  • Inspired
  • Motivated
  • Counseled
  • Supported
  • Engaged
  • Collaborated
  • Organized
  • Assessed

20 action verbs for the customer service industry

Add action verbs to your customer service industry to describe your excellent communication skills and the ability to direct users to what they need.

  • Collaborated
  • Clarified
  • Followed up
  • Anticipated
  • Educated
  • Advocated
  • Solved
  • Empathized
  • Accommodated
  • Facilitated

20 action verbs for the IT industry

These action verbs are commonly used in IT resumes to describe various technical tasks, projects and responsibilities, showcasing your expertise in software development, system administration and network management.

  • Developed
  • Implemented
  • Designed
  • Managed
  • Configured
  • Troubleshot
  • Maintained
  • Analyzed
  • Updated
  • Installed
  • Secured
  • Tested
  • Integrated
  • Optimized
  • Documented
  • Resolved
  • Monitored
  • Supported
  • Automated
  • Deployed

How to use action verbs for resumes

Adding action verbs to your resume can greatly enhance its impact and make your accomplishments stand out. Here’s how you can incorporate action verbs into the five different sections of your resume:

1. Professional summary or objective statement

In this section, you want to grab the hiring manager’s attention right away. Just below your resume headline, aim for two to three strong action verbs to start your resume summary or objective statement. Use these words to describe your skills, experience and career objectives.

Examples:

  • Results-driven social media manager professional with a proven track record in developing and executing successful campaigns.
  • Detail-oriented project manager with expertise in leading cross-functional teams to deliver projects on time and within budget.”

2. Work experience

Each bullet point under your work experience section should start with a powerful action verb that describes your accomplishments and responsibilities. Use past tense for previous roles and present tense for current roles.

Examples:

  • Developed and executed a comprehensive social media marketing strategy, resulting in a 50% increase in online engagement.
  • Manage a team of sales representatives, exceeding quarterly sales targets by 25%.

3. Skills section

Use action verbs in the skills section to describe how you applied your soft skills and hard skills. This gives employers a clearer picture of your capabilities.

Examples:

  • Using strong communication, I collaborated effectively on diverse projects, ensuring success.
  • Skilled in analyzing data to identify trends and make strategic business recommendations.

4. Education

Even in the education section, you can use action verbs to highlight your achievements, honors or extracurricular activities.

Examples:

  • Completed a thesis project on market trends in the tech industry, resulting in recognition at a national conference.
  • Earned Dean’s List honors for three consecutive semesters.

Ready to create a resume packed with action verbs? Our Resume Builder offers the best resume content suggestions and action verbs. You can even get professional resume writing help. Take advantage of these tools to get ready for the job search!

Want to check your resume for 30+ issues like typos, word length, customization and formatting? Resume Check catches your mistakes so hiring managers won’t.

 

How to use action verbs for cover letters

Action verbs can also significantly enhance your cover letter by demonstrating your achievements, skills and qualifications compellingly and dynamically. Here’s how you can use action verbs effectively in your cover letter:

1. Opening paragraph

In the opening paragraph, you want to grab the hiring manager’s attention and introduce yourself. Use action verbs to describe your enthusiasm for the position and relevant experiences.

2. Body paragraphs

In the body paragraphs, use action verbs to describe your specific skills, experiences and cover letter accomplishments relevant to the job you’re applying for. Focus on how you can add value to the company.

Showcase your knowledge of the company and how your skills align with its goals and values. Use action verbs to demonstrate your understanding of the company’s needs and how you can meet them.

3. Closing paragraph

In the closing paragraph, reiterate your enthusiasm for the position and express your eagerness to discuss how your skills and experiences align with the company’s needs. End with a strong call to action.

Our Cover Letter Builder simplifies the process of tailoring your cover letter with impactful resume action verbs and customizable content. Select a cover letter template, respond to a few prompts, and we’ll handle the rest! For inspiration to write your cover letter yourself, check out our cover letter examples.

How to use action verbs in interviews

Using action verbs during job interviews is a powerful way to demonstrate your skills, experiences and accomplishments in a dynamic and impactful way. When crafting your responses, identify the key skills and qualities the employer seeks. Then, tailor your answers to highlight how you have used specific action verbs to achieve results in your previous roles.

The STAR method (Situation, Task, Action, Result) is also important when structuring your responses. Start with the action (the “A” in STAR) to emphasize your role and contribution in a particular situation.

Examples:

List 5 words that describe your character.

“I would choose motivate, collaborate, innovate, resolve and adapt. These verbs capture my proactive and effective approach in any professional setting.”

Tell me about a time when you had to deal with conflict on the job?

“In a customer service role, I handled a situation where a guest was frustrated by a delay in their order. I responded with empathy, promptly communicating with the kitchen, providing updates, and offering complimentary beverages. By prioritizing communication and problem-solving, I ensured the quick delivery of their order and left the guest satisfied.”

Key takeaways on action verbs

  • Adding action verbs to your resume, CV, cover letter and interview captivates potential employers by highlighting your strengths.
  • Not all verbs are created equal for a resume. Select your words thoughtfully!
  • Diversify your use of resume verbs to enrich your job application.
  • Pairing action words with quantifiable figures in your resume.
  • Infuse your resume with active verbs throughout for optimal effectiveness.
  • Strategically utilizing resume action words can differentiate you from other applicants.

Action verbs FAQ

What’s the difference between resume action verbs and keywords?

Action verbs are dynamic and descriptive words used to highlight your accomplishments, skills, and responsibilities, showcasing what you have achieved in previous roles and how you contributed to projects or initiatives.

Resume keywords are specific terms or phrases directly related to the job you are applying for, strategically placed throughout your resume to align with the job description and demonstrate that you possess the necessary skills and qualifications.

How do action verbs enhance my resume and cover letter?

Action verbs add impact and clarity to your resume and cover letter by vividly describing your achievements, skills and responsibilities. They create a dynamic narrative that showcases your accomplishments and makes your application materials more engaging and compelling to potential employers.

Can action verbs help my resume get past applicant tracking systems (ATS)?

Yes, incorporating relevant action verbs in your resume can improve its chances of getting noticed by applicant tracking systems (ATS). ATS scans resumes for specific keywords and phrases, including action verbs related to the job description, industry and skills required.

What are good action verbs for high school students or person with no experience?

Here are some action verbs suitable for high school students or someone with limited work experience. These verbs can describe various skills, achievements and activities demonstrating capabilities and qualities relevant to entry-level positions.

Leadership and Initiative: Led, organized, initiated, coordinated, facilitated, motivated, guided.

Customer service and assistance: Assisted customers, provided support, addressed inquiries, resolved issues, responded to requests, offered assistance, interacted with clients.

Teamwork and collaboration: Supported, worked with, contributed to, assisted in, helped, engaged with, participated in.

About the Author

Ami Icanberry

Ami Icanberry

Ami holds a B.A. in Journalism, completed the Professional Sequence in Editing from UC Berkeley Extension and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW.) She’s an accomplished editor and content writer whose work appears in multiple notable publications including Cult of Mac, SF Magazine and Yosemite Conservacy.

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