Create a Winning Document With Our Operations Manager Resume Template for Word

Step 1: Writing Your Summary Statement

This operations manager resume template for Word starts with a good summary statement. Most hiring managers spend an average of six seconds reviewing a resume before moving to the next application. Your summary statement is the first thing that is read. It must be impactful enough to demand the attention of the reader. Make a sales pitch that resonates, but you only have a limited amount of space to pack in a lot of detail.

Your summary statement draws the conclusion you want your reader to form when the rest of your qualifications are examined. It also states why you are perfect for the job and why you want to work for the company.

That is a tall order for your introductory remarks. Ideally, you will find a way to make this statement in a single breath, but it should be no more than three sentences at the most. Use active words that demonstrate your competence.

Example Statement 1:

An experienced manager of operations with two decades of success in aerospace logistics brings competent leadership and optimization skills to your organization. Trained in lean manufacturing and Six Sigma certified.

Example Statement 2:

• Global supply chain expert
• Proven manager capable of motivating staff and improving results
• 15 years of international broker and freight forwarder experience

Example Statement 3:

Trusted Manager of Operations in the pharmaceuticals manufacturing industry seeks to improve your organization. Offering comprehensive business solutions, process optimizations, and costs savings.

Example Statement 4:

Manufacturing industry expert and logistics manager offers comprehensive skills. Eager to assist in improvements for your company with abilities to refine processes and find cost savings.

Step 2: Writing Your Skills Section

The second most important section of your resume is your specific set of skills. These skills are the methods and expertise you use to perform the job you applied for. You need to demonstrate that you have the competence to back up any boasting you have made in your summary statement. This operations manager template puts the importance of skills above work history and education because the bottom line is that you either can do the job or you cannot.

Place the most important skills first. Look over the job notification to see if your employer is asking for anything specific. If there are industry standards, special tools, or technology that you should know, list them here. Treat your skills as a proper name and capitalize them.

This Operations Manager resume template for Word offers the following skills common for this position:

• Strategic Planning
• Financial Oversight
• Process Development and Improvement
• Cost Analysis
• Conflict Resolution

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Step 3: Writing Your Work History Section

Your work history is a chance to show what you have been doing with your career. Past work experience should always indicate that it is building toward some outcome. Define that outcome with this section.
You only need to include jobs for the past seven years of your career, and not every single detail is important. Focus only on the aspects of your career that are relevant to the job you applying for. If there are gaps in your work history be prepared to explain them. Odd jobs and part-time work does not always have to be included if this experience has nothing to do with the position.

Best Practices:

• Include the name and location of a previous employer
• Briefly describe how you offered a benefit to the company
• List the dates that you were employed
• Avoid discussing pay or other forms of compensation

Examples from this operations manager resume template for Word that you can use:

• Drafted ISO procedures for company during certification phase
• Created 8% cost savings on inventory expenses through process improvements
• Negotiated contracts with suppliers that improved access to critical components
• Performed staffing analysis and created an optimization plan to control labor expenses

Step 4: Writing Your Education Section

The last section is your education. As an experienced professional, it is assumed that the value you have to offer a potential employer has grown since you graduated. If you are just starting out and have little work history to go off of, you may want to shuffle this section closer to the top.

Include the name and location of any school you have attended and also the degree program you completed. There is no need to list out every single credit you have completed, but you should give your prospective employer an idea of what your studies were like. Do not include your GPA, but list any academic awards you received.

Example:

Bachelor of Arts: Business Administration – 2007

California State University Sacramento, Sacramento CA

Courses include: Organizational Leadership, Business Finance, Project Management

Graduated Magna Cum Laude
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