Jobs in Worcester, MA

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 25,446 Jobs Available
  • 183,016 Population
  • $62,000 Average Salary
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Worcester Jobs At A Glance

Worcester At A Glance

A center of industry and commerce — the heart of the commonwealth — Worcester strives to be the greatest city in the world. One initiative entails using over $2 billion for private and public investment. The minds behind the city understand how difficult it can be to plant roots and assume responsibility in a community — to grow! — in a volatile job market. They believe their job is to shape tomorrow by giving everyone opportunity and prosperity today. Whether you're a student starting out or looking down the road at unemployment, Worcester wants you on the right track. Below is a summary of current info regarding the region's job market.

Job Market in Worcester

Job Market in Worcester

For the job seeker, everything from startups to highly regarded national corporations are available. Once one of the nation's most important manufacturing centers, Worcester has transformed into a Mecca for advanced manufacturing, biotech, health care, information technology and medical research. There are large and fast growing occupations. Be prepared to send out your resume and cover letter if you're a registered nurse, computer systems analysts, educator, civil servant or tradesmen.The most recent quarterly census showed average weekly wages for Worcester at $964. The national average was $1,048.

Resume Tips For Worcester Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Worcester Jobseekers

It's always a good time to think about improving your resume. The job market is a constantly evolving entity and technology has made producing one far too easy to not have one that stands out. Here are some useful guidelines for staying with the times.

  1. Understand the purpose of your resume, which is to get in the door and get the interview. Write with that in mind and you increase the chances you get the interview.
  2. Look for resumes that have appealing but practical layouts. The only thing a generic resume does is make you look generic. How far you should go should be based on the position sought and the company. A graphic designer may be expected to demonstrate their skill in a resume. A mechanical engineer? Not so much.
  3. Move away from dry tasks listings and aim for vivid descriptions. Implemented program incentives that resulted in an increase of customer accounts by 30%, not Responsible for customer accounts.
  4. The days of bland, one-size-fits-all resumes are dead. There was a time hiring managers understood you couldn't rework each resume on a typewriter. Today, there's absolutely no reason to not tailor your resume to each opportunity. And trust when we say that hiring managers can see when you haven't.
  5. Make sure your resume is computer friendly. Take an extra step and create a version for pasting into emails and text boxes. Have a PDF for attachment purposes. Use appropriate keywords to ensure it holds up in ATSs.

How to Find Jobs in Worcester

How to Find Jobs in Worcester

We often use the term "perfect job" or "perfect fit. " We admit to its hyperbole. Nothing's perfect. We do believe everyone needs a job that suits their strengths, opinions, weaknesses, personality, lifestyle and more. Here's why the right fit matters.

  1. Look at your employment history and make a list of what didn't work out. Through this dissection, you ensure you don't repeat mistakes and factor in what wasn't to your liking as you move forward.
  2. Stop being the subject during interviews. Interview the interviewer. Do your research through articles, company websites, market data and take your questions with you. Not only will it make for a better experience, you'll get a stronger picture of the company's culture and fit.
  3. Taking whatever job you can get is a short-term solution. Despite having a higher salary, shorter commute or fewer hours, it could lead to discomfort, lack of motivation and, worse, back to the unemployment ranks.
  4. When a hiring manager uses the term "not a good fit," perhaps this should be considered a good thing. If the job wouldn't be happy with you, what are the chances you'd be with them? We tend to want jobs so badly we don't see rejection as dodging a bullet.
  5. The right fit means feeling good about your job and, in turn, about yourself. That attitude's best for the company and for you. It opens up the possibility of productivity and growth.