Jobs in Washington, DC

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 51,441 Jobs Available
  • 658,893 Population
  • $72,000 Average Salary
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Washington Jobs At A Glance

Washington At A Glance

The Capitol Building. Gothic monuments to historic figures. The White House. Museums dedicated to air and space, architecture and construction, and espionage. The National Zoo, Constitution Gardens, the Library of Congress, the Wall.The list won't end any time soon. It's Washington, DC. It's not a city, it's a district. And the business opportunities make it a hub for not just residents, but the surrounding suburbs of Virginia and Maryland.Everyone has a chance for a great job. What follows is an introduction to the market, prospects and salaries in the nation's capital.

Job Market in Washington

Job Market in Washington

While the district saw its share of damage inflicted by a volatile economy, Washington's recent unemployment rates are its lowest since 2008. As of August 2015, that's 4.3%, compared to the national average of 5.2%. Not surprisingly, Washington's biggest sector is government and civil service. Another big player, no surprise, is hospitality, as the district is a year-round destination. Other top industries include telecommunications, medical and the legal profession. For the candidate that wants to know what companies are looking for, the district's largest occupations have been identified as registered nursing, government employment, retail sales, cashiers, and professional and business services.Weekly average salaries in the district are $1,400, compared to the national average of $1,000.

Resume Tips For Washington Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Washington Jobseekers

A resume has a single purpose and that's to get the interview. As an advertisement, it has to sell you. Here are a few tips for selling the product — you — and getting hiring managers to buy.

  1. Use the first lines of each section to grab attention. As the average resume is scanned at first, knock their socks off with your openings. Let the reader scan and become interested enough to start over with careful attention.
  2. For the work history, focus on the most recent experiences. Except in extreme circumstances, avoid going back more than a decade, with each experience getting less attention. If you're still working, the most recent job should be written in present tense.
  3. Do research about sectors in the region, such as the occupations and industries listed above. Establish where your talents and background are best suited, tailoring resumes and cover letters to impress hiring managers.
  4. Produce a clean, simple document. That means consistency and uniformity across the board, including whether or not bullet points end with periods and how dates will be formatted.
  5. Besides keywords, make sure your resume is jam packed with action words that imply production: broadened, accomplished, appraised, generated, investigated, ranked, increased, lowered, etc.

How to Find Jobs in Washington

How to Find Jobs in Washington

Washington, DC, attracts top talent. Indeed. com has reported the district as having a 1:1 ratio of opportunities to unemployed individuals. That doesn't mean proving you stand out isn't a consideration. Here are a few things to keep in mind about the capital's job market and how to navigate it.

  1. The district has a broad range of resources that are pretty much at your fingertips. The Washington Post keeps updated postings and even hosts job fairs. USAJobs. gov lists government openings. Washington also has unique counseling, training and programs for students, veterans and the disabled.
  2. Both candidates and recruiters are using social media to find one another. The Post alone has almost a half dozen Twitter accounts for job seekers. Even large companies are using Twitter to recruit. From LinkedIn to Facebook, pump up your professional social profile.
  3. Washington is an epicenter of volunteer work. This can be beneficial. You can close gaps in your resume with it, letting hiring managers see you're serious about being productive. You'll make contacts, build reputation and be proactive for a good cause.
  4. Make sure you know the job you're applying for is the right one. Think about what will make you happy or what you didn't like about your most recent employer. Look at yourself and your situation with a fresh eye and where your talent is best applied.
  5. Carefully tailor all materials to what employers want. That means excising irrelevant experiences from your resume, cover letters and interviews. Exploring your full potential will be part of the process, but get in the door proving you have the right stuff.