Jobs in Vancouver, WA

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 14,508 Jobs Available
  • 169,294 Population
  • $56,000 Average Salary
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Vancouver Jobs At A Glance

Vancouver At A Glance

Vancouver wants to be recognized as economically innovative, sustainable and creative. To afford all its residents a prosperous future, the city implements programs and initiatives that address all stages of business growth.If you're looking for work, take advantage of the information below about Vancouver, its industries, top professions and salaries. You'll realize there's a light at the end of the tunnel.

Job Market in Vancouver

Job Market in Vancouver

In the Bureau of Labor Statistics's annual labor surveys, Vancouver economics, along with other cities in the region, are directly identified and characterized with its neighbor, Portland, Oregon, as they share borders, industries and commuters.According to the latest figures, the United States was carrying an unemployment rate of 4.9% while the Portland/Vancouver area had a slightly higher number of 5.2%. This is lower than a year earlier, when the rate was 5.9%. The region and the U.S. are sharing an average weekly wage of about $1,000.The biggest employer is trade, transportation and utilities, a sector with a significant impact on any economy. It entails a broad range of industries that provide cargo and passenger transportation, warehousing and goods storage, electric power, steam and water supply, sewage removal, natural gas and more. Other major industries are government, leisure and hospitality, manufacturing, education and health services. As for occupations, the largest are retail salespersons and cashiers, food preparation (cooks, servers, fast food), registered nurses and customer service representatives.

Resume Tips For Vancouver Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Vancouver Jobseekers

Nothing's worse than wondering why you never heard back after submitting your resume. Well, the tiniest thing can turn off a hiring manager. Here are a few almost minor things we've seen that's put a candidate's resume in the "No" pile.

  1. Unless you lack hands-on experience, do not include information unless it's relevant to the job in question. Being a part time bouncer at a nightclub will mean nothing to someone that needs a bank teller.
  2. Resumes that go too far back can hurt your chances. They date you in a world of younger candidates willing to work for less. You also increase the chance that hiring managers will reject you because you've given them so much information, they can make an immediate decision about your candidacy.
  3. References are expected, but employers ask for references if they're interested. There's no reason to supply them before asked and there's certainly no reason to put them in your resume.
  4. Stop giving titles to contact information. You don't need to say "Address," "Phone," or "eMail. " They know what it is. Resume experts say in today's market you don't an address. The days of hiring managers sending a letter to arrange an interview are done.
  5. Never include any type of salary information in resumes, contact letters or other non-negotiating exchanges. It sends the wrong message and will hurt your chances.

How to Find Jobs in Vancouver

How to Find Jobs in Vancouver

You may be anxious to get back to the grind, but tread carefully. You'll be spending 2,000 hours a year at the job. Try and find something that matters. Here are a few tips for doing that.

  1. Look for an environment that matches your sensibilities. Values are extremely important to job success. What aspects are most pleasing to you: bonuses, social status, time left for family, commute, making a difference? Use the answers to make decisions.
  2. If you're interested in a company or specific position, arrange some informational interviews. Don't promote the fact you're looking for work. It will only irritate the individual that believed you simply wanted counsel.
  3. A job search can go on and on. At some point, you may be tempted to grab what you can get. Resist the temptation. While you may not end up with a job that has everything you want, don't give up on your priorities completely. Other offers will come.
  4. Keep in mind the right fit may not be what you think. Most people end up loving a job they never thought they'd want. Keep an open mind as you look for work. Take an employment or career quiz to give yourself some ideas.
  5. Consider temping or volunteering in an industry to get an idea of what it would be like. It'll look good on your resume and provide experience.