Jobs in San Francisco, CA

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 5,775 Jobs Available
  • 852,469 Population
  • $78,000 Average Salary
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San Francisco Jobs At A Glance

San Francisco At A Glance

What's it like to live in San Francisco?If you know The Mission, you're getting fat off burritos. You wonder if you'll ever get used to driving those steep hills they call streets. You treat walking like a nature hike with steps that go for days and streets that force you to walk at 90 degree angles. You're smart enough to know if the Giants are in town, stay home and watch the game. The traffic isn't worth it.The job market has its own humorous sides, depending on how you look at it. In May of 2014, website SFGate ran a story with the headline "S.F.'s new job problem: Everyone's working." Before packing your bags, read the following about San Fran's job market.

Job Market in San Francisco

Job Market in San Francisco

At the time of that SFGate article, the Bay Area was enjoying its lowest unemployment levels in years. It's recent numbers are at 4.2% versus the U.S. average of 5.2%. In the first quarter of 2015, average weekly wages in San Fran were a third higher than national figures ($1,669 vs. $1.048, respectively).The tourism industry is the backbone of the city's economy. That means anything associated with hospitality is a good bet. With over two dozen international financial institutions within its borders, financial services ranks high and makes the city a global financial center. The Bay Area is recognized as a techno paradise. The medical industry also lists high, with over 5% of the population employed here.If you want to hedge your chances of finding work in San Francisco, look into computer software engineer or analyst, web development, marketing management, secretarial and administrative assistant, and first-line supervision in retail sales.

Resume Tips For San Francisco Jobseekers

Resume Tips For San Francisco Jobseekers

Writing a resume that conveys skill, experience and education is never easy. It has to have a goal — get the interview! — and meet it in a concise manner. Here are five tips that will benefit any resume.

  1. Focus content on what your contribution means to the employer. Avoid common statements and preferences like what you're seeking in a job. Outline what you have to offer.
  2. Sweat the small stuff. If you want the interview, everything about your resume has to be flawless. Consistent bullets, italicizing and bolding, clean borders, font sizes neither too small or too large. Your resume is an indicator of how organized you are.
  3. Do research about sectors in the region, such as the occupations and industries listed above. Establish where your talents and background are best suited, tailoring resumes and cover letters to impress hiring managers.
  4. Treat a resume like a marketing presentation. Fill it with numbers, statistics, percentages and stories.
  5. It's a good idea to not age yourself. Stick to recent experiences and highlight why you're good at what you do. Age discrimination may be unfair, but it exists. And not for reasons of age. Younger candidates can be as skilled and willing to work for less.

How to Find Jobs in San Francisco

How to Find Jobs in San Francisco

Competition is fierce. This is the home of Google, Apple, Bain & Company and more industry leaders than you could shake a burrito at. Be prepared to work hard.

  1. Look at what you consider a great place to work. Google is famous for skateboarding in the halls and setting down wherever you choose to work. You may appreciate that vibe, or prefer the privacy of cubes and structure. Find a culture that suits you and aim for it.
  2. Connect via informational interviews. It's not easy to get busy people to sit down and talk, but if you've cultivated solid contacts, you've increased the chances someone in the field can offer advice and insights.
  3. It can take time to find work. Keep yourself occupied with daily job search related activities, but also get all that stuff done you didn't have time for before.
  4. Don't sink in the solitude of job hunting. Join an industry-related club or job support group. You'll get to share ideas, strategies, hear about opportunities and, at the very least, know you're not alone.
  5. Make every interview the best conversation you ever had. Research employers, get there early, dress professionally, answer and ask questions confidently, and inquire about the next step in the process.