Jobs in Richmond, VA

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 2,263 Jobs Available
  • 217,853 Population
  • $58,000 Average Salary
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Richmond Jobs At A Glance

Richmond At A Glance

With its charming cobblestone streets and concentrically sprawled suburbs, it'd be easy to forget that this is a city with big-city concerns and aspirations. But it is. Richmond nurtures career and business growth. They advocate entrepreneurship and foster assets, all to improve quality of life. From programs designed for new and expanding business to funds allocated to stimulate job creation, Richmond is going to maintain a vibrant, attractive economy.Job seekers, take note. You may be walking a dimly lit path to find work, but Richmond keeps a candle burning. Review this preliminary introduction to the city's job market, job prospects, salaries, and job search and resume tips. You'll see that Richmond wants everyone to succeed.

Job Market in Richmond

Job Market in Richmond

The national average weekly salary in 1Q 2015 was $1,048. The Richmond average was lower by $36. Both local and national unemployment rates are and have been tight as well. Over the last six months, the numbers have never been more than 0.6% apart. As of September 2015, rates were 4.5% (Richmond) and 4.9% (U.S.). The largest employers in Richmond are trade, transportation and utilities, and government. If you have the training and background, you're perfect for these industries, putting you in the running for civil service, warehousing, storage, retail and trained technician. Other top industries include financial services, education, health services, and professional and business services. These cover everything from banker tellers to business consultants and public school teachers. Leisure and hospitality is also a significant economic factor as Richmond's historical significance makes it a strong tourist destination.

Resume Tips For Richmond Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Richmond Jobseekers

Resumes go into three categories: (i) top candidates, (ii) hold for review, (iii) not interested. Here are some tips for making sure your resume makes the top category.

  1. Stay away from "results oriented," "team player," "self motivated" and other hyperbole. They're useless in tracking systems and mean nothing to hiring managers. You're better off using words and phrases taken directly from the posting.
  2. Create a text version of your resume so that you have a decently formatted version for text boxes and emails. Also keep a PDF version as WORD formats can break based on versions and machines.
  3. The top half of your resume has to be filled with relevant and appealing information. If we go by the "six second rule," you need to impress fast and if the hiring manager doesn't find substance up top, they probably won't look further down.
  4. Write from the reader's point of view. Pack your content with information that the hiring manager wants to hear.
  5. Find a balance between visuals and content. Your formatting shouldn't distract from the content unless you're trying to prove something, like you're an excellent graphic designer or know how to prepare a striking presentation.

How to Find Jobs in Richmond

How to Find Jobs in Richmond

Outside of the resume, the most important step in getting a job is the interview. This one-on-one can create all types of anxiety. Being prepared can minimize that stress.

  1. Consult with an industry insider before the interview. If it's someone at the company, even better. Reach out to a personal contact or someone in your group on LinkedIn. Get an idea of the company's operations, where the position fits in and what kind of questions to expect at the interview.
  2. Don't just be professional, be polite. Arrive early, sit up straight, maintain eye contact. Build a rapport by using the interviewer's name. Read up on active listening and how your body language can relax the other person.
  3. Before leaving the interview, make a direct statement about how much you'd like to work for the company and why. Ask about the next step in the process and what you might do to help move it along. Don't be pushy or anxious, but let them know you want this job.
  4. Go on the web and find everything from typical to unusual interview questions. Get a handle on what the behavioral interview is. Take notes as to how you'd handle anything the interviewer might throw at you.
  5. Plan out your pre-interview activities, especially travel time. You want to be relaxed and ready. Getting stuck in traffic or forgetting something will only get everything off to a poor start.