Top 5 Mistakes on Manager Resumes

Top 5 Mistakes on Manager Resumes

Being a manager means having to lead people, tackle unpleasant tasks like scheduling and disciplinary actions, and filling out what can feel like mountains of paperwork. Unfortunately, managers have a lot on their plates, and when it comes time to do a little job hunting, many candidates, like everyone else, make mistakes on their resumes. Here are some common mistakes on manager resumes and how to avoid them.

 

Using Vague Language 

As a manager, it's your job to ensure that productivity stays up, revenue increases, and workload, backlog, and costs all stay down. When you put all these tasks on your resume, you should be explaining not only what you did on a day-to-day basis--it's obvious that you managed a store or a department--but what changes you made for the company. Did you increase revenue, productivity, or efficiency by a quantifiable margin? Put that margin on your resume. Hiring managers want concrete evidence that you'll make the company more productive if they hire you, not just that you'll show up and manage things. 

Typos and Grammatical Mistakes 

Another common mistake on manager resumes is typographical in nature. You might have everything together, from your job to your painstakingly clean apartment, but if you misspell words or use them incorrectly on your resume, you will look like you're scatterbrained, disorganized, and inattentive to detail. Proofread your resume every time you send it out--don't just rely on spell check--and get someone else to look over it to see if there's anything you've missed. 

Not Tailoring Your Resume 

As a manager, you want your employees to be committed to their job, and that includes prospective employees. So why wouldn't you commit to a prospective job by tailoring your resume to fit the duties and responsibilities of the position? Read the description carefully, taking note of any keywords that pop out at you, and rewrite, or at least edit, your resume to conform to the requirements and characteristics of that particular position. This will show that you're interested in getting that job, and not just any job at any company. 

Hiding Your Contact Info 

The hiring manager has a lot of these resumes to look at, so if you make it too hard to find your contact information, she's going to move on to the next candidate in the stack. Make it easy for her to reach you. Check and double-check that your e-mail and phone number are correct on your resume and cover letter, and put them near your name in slightly smaller (but still legible) type so that they can easily find how to contact you. 

Getting a job as a manager can be as difficult as doing the job itself, so there's no reason to make it any harder. Follow these tips and check out LiveCareer's Resume Builder to write the best error-free manager resume possible.

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