Avoiding Salary-Negotiation Blunders


Wendy writes:
I recently sent a resume/cover letter for a management position in a state I
would like to re-locate to. Unfortunately I read your do’s and don’ts list after
I had my initial phone interview. I had no idea what salary range they were
offering and was afraid I might be looking for more than what they were
offering (the cost of living is less there). I told them how much I make now
and said I was willing to accept 25 percent less due to the difference in the cost
of living (I made an error there too — I would the figure is actually 15 percent less).
There was no job offer made but I am flying there again this week for a
second in-person interview. If they do offer me the job how can I negotiate
after I’ve already given them this range of 25 percent less-present salary? I also
did not take into consideration the fact that my husband doesn’t have a job
there yet either so I really need to make at least what I am now or 10 percent
more. I looked at salary ranges and I would be within reason in asking for
this. Is there anyway to take my foot out of my mouth now? Is there any
hope? Please advise.


The Career Doctor responds:
You’ve definitely made a salary negotiation blunder but it’s not a lost
cause — yet. Not only did you make a mistake in divulging salary information
and not only did you make a mistake in your calculations but by doing what
you did you also made it seem as though you are a bit desperate for
the job — so you should be VERY pleased you are going for another interview.
Your key at this next interview if a job offer is extended is to make a strong
case for a reasonable salary — given your experience level given the job itself
given the cost of living etc. Do NOT bring your husband or any other personal
needs into the equation. To persuade an employer about salary you
need to use legitimate business reasons for a higher salary — not personal
reasons.
Be sure and review the
salary negotiation tutorial and other
salary negotiation
resources
published on Quintessential Careers before making the trip.
Best of luck.

;

Wendy writes:
I recently sent a resume/cover letter for a management position in a state I
would like to re-locate to. Unfortunately I read your do’s and don’ts list after
I had my initial phone interview. I had no idea what salary range they were
offering and was afraid I might be looking for more than what they were
offering (the cost of living is less there). I told them how much I make now
and said I was willing to accept 25 percent less due to the difference in the cost
of living (I made an error there too — I would the figure is actually 15 percent less).
There was no job offer made but I am flying there again this week for a
second in-person interview. If they do offer me the job how can I negotiate
after I’ve already given them this range of 25 percent less-present salary? I also
did not take into consideration the fact that my husband doesn’t have a job
there yet either so I really need to make at least what I am now or 10 percent
more. I looked at salary ranges and I would be within reason in asking for
this. Is there anyway to take my foot out of my mouth now? Is there any
hope? Please advise.


The Career Doctor responds:
You’ve definitely made a salary negotiation blunder but it’s not a lost
cause — yet. Not only did you make a mistake in divulging salary information
and not only did you make a mistake in your calculations but by doing what
you did you also made it seem as though you are a bit desperate for
the job — so you should be VERY pleased you are going for another interview.
Your key at this next interview if a job offer is extended is to make a strong
case for a reasonable salary — given your experience level given the job itself
given the cost of living etc. Do NOT bring your husband or any other personal
needs into the equation. To persuade an employer about salary you
need to use legitimate business reasons for a higher salary — not personal
reasons.
Be sure and review the
salary negotiation tutorial and other
salary negotiation
resources
published on Quintessential Careers before making the trip.
Best of luck.