Take Survival Job After Termination?


Bart writes:
I was fired for the first time ever. The reason they gave me was slowness
in performance. I immediately started job hunting and have been looking ever
since. It’s been a couple of months now and I need a job — soon!
If I have been unsuccessful finding a job in my career field through these past
months should I just take any job I can get? I need to pay the bills and I know
there are lots of low-wage jobs around — and one of those would at least get me
back on my feet financially.



The Career Doctor responds:
I totally understand your frustrations with job-hunting and while I’ll say more in the
following paragraphs the bottom-line is you must do what you must do to survive…
and if that involves taking a survival job for a week a month or something longer
it’s certainly better to do that than lose your house car or other possessions.
The employment situation for many job-seekers has not been very good over the
past few years and while we continue to see some glimmers of hope that things
are improving (new jobs are being created) we also see other reports that some
employers are still planning more layoffs this year and that some jobs will never
come back (due to productivity gains or migration of those jobs overseas).
You have to remain positive you will find a way back to your old career — or
find a path to a new and exciting career. I know that the longer a job search lasts
the harder it is to remain positive. And I know that being fired is obviously still
weighing on your mind. Employers can sense desperation or doubt so you
need to get the past behind you and focus on the future one that includes
you back employed in your career field.
How are your job-hunting skills? Are you using your network to its full
potential? Have you stayed active in your professional organization (and
perhaps its online discussion board if it has one)? Have you tapped into
the alumni network of your college? Try to accomplish some job-search
activity every day — even after you take the survival job.
And most employers see survival jobs especially in light of the recent
employment situation as more positive than negative… so if you need
to pay the bills take one of those survival jobs but keep your job search
moving forward.

;

Bart writes:
I was fired for the first time ever. The reason they gave me was slowness
in performance. I immediately started job hunting and have been looking ever
since. It’s been a couple of months now and I need a job — soon!
If I have been unsuccessful finding a job in my career field through these past
months should I just take any job I can get? I need to pay the bills and I know
there are lots of low-wage jobs around — and one of those would at least get me
back on my feet financially.



The Career Doctor responds:
I totally understand your frustrations with job-hunting and while I’ll say more in the
following paragraphs the bottom-line is you must do what you must do to survive…
and if that involves taking a survival job for a week a month or something longer
it’s certainly better to do that than lose your house car or other possessions.
The employment situation for many job-seekers has not been very good over the
past few years and while we continue to see some glimmers of hope that things
are improving (new jobs are being created) we also see other reports that some
employers are still planning more layoffs this year and that some jobs will never
come back (due to productivity gains or migration of those jobs overseas).
You have to remain positive you will find a way back to your old career — or
find a path to a new and exciting career. I know that the longer a job search lasts
the harder it is to remain positive. And I know that being fired is obviously still
weighing on your mind. Employers can sense desperation or doubt so you
need to get the past behind you and focus on the future one that includes
you back employed in your career field.
How are your job-hunting skills? Are you using your network to its full
potential? Have you stayed active in your professional organization (and
perhaps its online discussion board if it has one)? Have you tapped into
the alumni network of your college? Try to accomplish some job-search
activity every day — even after you take the survival job.
And most employers see survival jobs especially in light of the recent
employment situation as more positive than negative… so if you need
to pay the bills take one of those survival jobs but keep your job search
moving forward.