Some Basic Research Needed in This Job Search


Laura writes:
I am trying to get work in production companies as I want to make the move
into helping people make TV programs and documentaries. It has proven
extremely difficult but I will continue to keep trying this year.
Because I don’t know the position I am applying for — it makes it hard for
me to write a letter to the company because I don’t really know what’s
involved in making a show I don’t really know where I want to be in that plan. . .
does this make sense? I am happy to work as an assistant and all that to
start off with but is there a way that you can cover this in a cold cover letter?
I basically just want to get into the company — find out what’s going on
and work my way up.



The Career Doctor responds:
You face several problems common to many job-seekers and I’ll try and address
all of them for you — and for all those other job-seekers in similar situations.
First you must not sound desperate (and unqualified). Even though I totally
understand your point about doing anything to just break into the business
employers aren’t interested in people who sound desperate (and willing to do
anything) to get a foot in the door. You need to clearly identify a job that interests
you — and that you are qualified for — and then apply to the hiring managers at
the production companies with a dynamic cover letter and powerful resume.
Second you need to discover the position you are seeking. How you accomplish
this important step is through two methods — traditional research and informational interviews. There is so much career information available from so many sources –
offline and online — that you should easily become quite knowledgeable about
production companies. The other method of getting information has benefits
beyond learning about production positions. With informational interviews you
will not only get the information you seek but you will begin building your network
within the production industry — which should open some doors for you once you’ve
clearly identified the position you seek.
Third a great way to break into a new industry is through volunteering. You should
look into local colleges and universities that have production facilities. By volunteering
you will not only build your portfolio you will also be expanding your network.
Fourth while there are some success stories of company presidents who started
in the mailroom more often than not you can easily get pigeon-holed as the
great assistant — but one who will never be considered for a promotion into what
you really want to do.
So do your research polish your job-search materials network and go after a
specific job. And be sure to follow-up each and every job lead — until you land that job.
I recommend you review some or all of the steps in this tutorial published on
Quintessential Careers: Job Search 101.

;

Laura writes:
I am trying to get work in production companies as I want to make the move
into helping people make TV programs and documentaries. It has proven
extremely difficult but I will continue to keep trying this year.
Because I don’t know the position I am applying for — it makes it hard for
me to write a letter to the company because I don’t really know what’s
involved in making a show I don’t really know where I want to be in that plan. . .
does this make sense? I am happy to work as an assistant and all that to
start off with but is there a way that you can cover this in a cold cover letter?
I basically just want to get into the company — find out what’s going on
and work my way up.



The Career Doctor responds:
You face several problems common to many job-seekers and I’ll try and address
all of them for you — and for all those other job-seekers in similar situations.
First you must not sound desperate (and unqualified). Even though I totally
understand your point about doing anything to just break into the business
employers aren’t interested in people who sound desperate (and willing to do
anything) to get a foot in the door. You need to clearly identify a job that interests
you — and that you are qualified for — and then apply to the hiring managers at
the production companies with a dynamic cover letter and powerful resume.
Second you need to discover the position you are seeking. How you accomplish
this important step is through two methods — traditional research and informational interviews. There is so much career information available from so many sources –
offline and online — that you should easily become quite knowledgeable about
production companies. The other method of getting information has benefits
beyond learning about production positions. With informational interviews you
will not only get the information you seek but you will begin building your network
within the production industry — which should open some doors for you once you’ve
clearly identified the position you seek.
Third a great way to break into a new industry is through volunteering. You should
look into local colleges and universities that have production facilities. By volunteering
you will not only build your portfolio you will also be expanding your network.
Fourth while there are some success stories of company presidents who started
in the mailroom more often than not you can easily get pigeon-holed as the
great assistant — but one who will never be considered for a promotion into what
you really want to do.
So do your research polish your job-search materials network and go after a
specific job. And be sure to follow-up each and every job lead — until you land that job.
I recommend you review some or all of the steps in this tutorial published on
Quintessential Careers: Job Search 101.