So Bored She Wants to Cry


Bridget writes:
I need HELP! I’m currently and have been for the past 4 years working as a
recruiter/human resources. I’ve recently gotten promoted to an HR generalist.
At any rate I’m SO BORED with this job I just want to cry sometimes. I am
very grateful that I have a job and my co-workers/manager really like my work but
I just think that I spend too much time at work to be unhappy. I just can’t stand it.
I went to college and got my degree in marketing with an emphasis in promotions
and special-event planning but I accidentally got in HR and have been here ever
since. I’m dying. HELP!


The Career Doctor responds:
Please promise me you will take some time off as soon as possible and
get your life and career in order. No one should be working in a job that
brings you to tears. You are still young and it’s still early in your professional
life so career change should not be too difficult for you. The harder decision
and work will be making the commitment to actually change your situation.
One of my personal and professional priorities is helping people find their
life and work passion. We’re only on this Earth a finite time so we should
try and find what we enjoy doing — what we’re good at — as early as possible.
Besides the fact it should be the right of every job-seeker having a job that
fits you — that you have a passion for — will also help your mental and physical
health.
So how do you do it?
First go back to your college major. Why did you choose marketing and event
planning? Are you still interested in that field? If not then take the time to do
some self-reflection and self-assessment. Examine the types of activities you
enjoy. Is there a hobby you really love? Is there any aspect of your current job
you enjoy? Consider taking one or more assessment tests; there are several
good free ones on the Web. Once you’ve developed some ideas of activities
you enjoy the next step is researching potential careers that use those skills.
Second make a career change plan. Once you know the type of job(s) that
interest you the next step is developing a plan to make a career change.
Making a successful career transition will require some mix of these elements:
further education or training gaining work experience in the field organizing transferable skills developing a new resume and networking.
Read more in my article on Quintessential Careers:
The 10-Step Plan to Career Change.

;

Bridget writes:
I need HELP! I’m currently and have been for the past 4 years working as a
recruiter/human resources. I’ve recently gotten promoted to an HR generalist.
At any rate I’m SO BORED with this job I just want to cry sometimes. I am
very grateful that I have a job and my co-workers/manager really like my work but
I just think that I spend too much time at work to be unhappy. I just can’t stand it.
I went to college and got my degree in marketing with an emphasis in promotions
and special-event planning but I accidentally got in HR and have been here ever
since. I’m dying. HELP!


The Career Doctor responds:
Please promise me you will take some time off as soon as possible and
get your life and career in order. No one should be working in a job that
brings you to tears. You are still young and it’s still early in your professional
life so career change should not be too difficult for you. The harder decision
and work will be making the commitment to actually change your situation.
One of my personal and professional priorities is helping people find their
life and work passion. We’re only on this Earth a finite time so we should
try and find what we enjoy doing — what we’re good at — as early as possible.
Besides the fact it should be the right of every job-seeker having a job that
fits you — that you have a passion for — will also help your mental and physical
health.
So how do you do it?
First go back to your college major. Why did you choose marketing and event
planning? Are you still interested in that field? If not then take the time to do
some self-reflection and self-assessment. Examine the types of activities you
enjoy. Is there a hobby you really love? Is there any aspect of your current job
you enjoy? Consider taking one or more assessment tests; there are several
good free ones on the Web. Once you’ve developed some ideas of activities
you enjoy the next step is researching potential careers that use those skills.
Second make a career change plan. Once you know the type of job(s) that
interest you the next step is developing a plan to make a career change.
Making a successful career transition will require some mix of these elements:
further education or training gaining work experience in the field organizing transferable skills developing a new resume and networking.
Read more in my article on Quintessential Careers:
The 10-Step Plan to Career Change.