Should I Stay or Should I Go?


Janki writes:
I am a young professional (25) marketing coordinator and through no fault of my own have had 3 jobs in the past 2 years. Both positions had unforeseen incidences where staff was laid off — so “last one hired…”

I have a stable job now but I fear that there is no room for financial growth. I have taken steps within this small company to redesign things add my graphics talents strategize market research — all on my own and with my own initiative. The problem is that my boss is pleased but doesn’t seem to think that I am doing anything more than what he envisioned me to do. I don’t know how to show him that I am taking extra steps and should be compensated.

The other thing is that there is that nosy secretary who insists on having a daily power play with me regarding formats things produced etc.

My big question is — should I just stay here for a year since I don’t have a great employment record (the jobs were great but short) should I look around should I tell my boss that I want a raise after just 6 months? Also to make matters worse there is a general company policy of extensive unpaid overtime — everyone here is a martyr and the average length of employment is 12 years!

HELP!!


The Career Doctor responds:
Sounds as though you are working for a small company which has its good and bad though you seem to be experiencing more of the bad right now. The good is that you are expanding your skills and marketability by going above and beyond your job description.

I don’t feel I have enough information to make a good recommendation for you. I will tell you that the once ill-perceived “job-hopping” stereotype has been removed. Yes employers seek stability but because employers are not as loyal to their employees as in the past more employers recognize that some people will have several short stints on their resumes due either to some form of corporate re-engineering or to advancement.

My gut feeling is that you should try and stick out the job a little longer. You will be able to continue to build your skills while having a steady job. Then after Labor Day I would start using my network to test the waters. Then depending on the results and other criteria start a full-scale job search.