No Jobs for New Technology Grads?


Rahul writes:
I am a college sophomore with computer science as my major. I am
really getting worried about the fact that there are absolutely no entry-level technology jobs for new graduates. Furthermore I have been
hearing about increasing numbers of technology jobs being offshored. I am 26 years old and by the time I get my BS degree I would
be 28. I shall be grateful to you if you may please answer to the following
questions:

  1. Is it really worth to pursue a computer science degree?
    No jobs and also the prospect of offshoring — is this career doomed?
    (Interestingly the Department of Labor presents a rosy future for
    technology career.)

  2. Could my age be a hindrance to my career?
  3. If the offshoring does gain momentum what do you
    expect to happen to IT job outlook?

The Career Doctor responds:
It certainly does seem to be a contradiction that is worth investigating.
Technology-related careers dominate the U.S Department of Labor’s list
of the fastest (projected) growing jobs over the next five to 10 years. At
the same time a report from Forrester Research predicts that during the
next 10-15 years at least 3.3 million white-collar jobs — including IT jobs –
will move out of the U.S. to countries such as India China and others
where labor is cheaper. Add to the mix the current job market — especially
in the technology industry — and you get one confusing mess about what to expect.
Regardless of the conflicting opinions about the future of IT jobs — or any
career field for that matter — what I tell job-seekers is that if you love your
job/career are good at what you do have the necessary education/training/certifications
and can master job-search skills then you should be able to find a job.
Finding a job might take longer than you expect you might have to be
open to relocating you might need to readjust your expectations and
you might have to work a lot harder than you expected but you’ll find a job.
So should you continue your computer science degree? Well in reality
only you can answer that question…but the jobs will be there. They may
be harder to find but they will be there. Will your age be a problem? No.
The currency of your skills and certifications will be more important.
And what will happen to the IT and all the other service professions as
more jobs are relocated outside the U.S.? The expectation is that slowly –
very slowly as the economy continues to recover and businesses start
hiring again — that job creation in other companies will overtake the losses
from jobs going overseas. But in all honesty it’s really too soon to tell
what will happen…thus you need to focus on making yourself
the strongest job-seeker possible.
As a college student one of the best things you can do besides getting
your education is obtaining valuable experience. Consider internships
and freelancing to get as much experience as you can. Go to this section
of Quintessential Careers: Internship
Resources for College Students
.

;

Rahul writes:
I am a college sophomore with computer science as my major. I am
really getting worried about the fact that there are absolutely no entry-level technology jobs for new graduates. Furthermore I have been
hearing about increasing numbers of technology jobs being offshored. I am 26 years old and by the time I get my BS degree I would
be 28. I shall be grateful to you if you may please answer to the following
questions:

  1. Is it really worth to pursue a computer science degree?
    No jobs and also the prospect of offshoring — is this career doomed?
    (Interestingly the Department of Labor presents a rosy future for
    technology career.)

  2. Could my age be a hindrance to my career?
  3. If the offshoring does gain momentum what do you
    expect to happen to IT job outlook?

The Career Doctor responds:
It certainly does seem to be a contradiction that is worth investigating.
Technology-related careers dominate the U.S Department of Labor’s list
of the fastest (projected) growing jobs over the next five to 10 years. At
the same time a report from Forrester Research predicts that during the
next 10-15 years at least 3.3 million white-collar jobs — including IT jobs –
will move out of the U.S. to countries such as India China and others
where labor is cheaper. Add to the mix the current job market — especially
in the technology industry — and you get one confusing mess about what to expect.
Regardless of the conflicting opinions about the future of IT jobs — or any
career field for that matter — what I tell job-seekers is that if you love your
job/career are good at what you do have the necessary education/training/certifications
and can master job-search skills then you should be able to find a job.
Finding a job might take longer than you expect you might have to be
open to relocating you might need to readjust your expectations and
you might have to work a lot harder than you expected but you’ll find a job.
So should you continue your computer science degree? Well in reality
only you can answer that question…but the jobs will be there. They may
be harder to find but they will be there. Will your age be a problem? No.
The currency of your skills and certifications will be more important.
And what will happen to the IT and all the other service professions as
more jobs are relocated outside the U.S.? The expectation is that slowly –
very slowly as the economy continues to recover and businesses start
hiring again — that job creation in other companies will overtake the losses
from jobs going overseas. But in all honesty it’s really too soon to tell
what will happen…thus you need to focus on making yourself
the strongest job-seeker possible.
As a college student one of the best things you can do besides getting
your education is obtaining valuable experience. Consider internships
and freelancing to get as much experience as you can. Go to this section
of Quintessential Careers: Internship
Resources for College Students
.