Negotiating to Get What You Want in Job Offer


Rebecca writes:
I just received an amazing offer letter from the company I would like to now
work with and I am in need of some advice. Regarding salary negotiation
what is the best way to try to get some of the other things you want from
your future employer? The offer is good but there are some other things that
I would like to ask for. Is it OK to ask and not have the employer think you
are being petty picky or too high-maintenance? Or would it be best to take
the offer as it is and then see at a 6-month review where you stand what
you’ve done for the revenue growth etc.



The Career Doctor responds:
Timing and finesse are everything in salary negotiation. Job-seekers should always try
to hold off salary negotiation to the very end — once you have convinced the employer
you are the one candidate who can fill the position. Ideally negotiation should begin
before an offer letter is sent though I know any number of employers that don’t
believe in negotiating until they send the letter or contract.
That said and assuming no other negotiation has taken place and that you have not
accepted the offer you are certainly in your right to make a counter proposal to your
prospective employer — however you must be prepared for any number of responses
including a retraction of the entire offer.
The key to a counter proposal just as with salary negotiation is research. Since you
seem okay with the salary but want to add/adjust some of the benefits research
comparable benefits within your industry at your level. Many employers are more
willing to renegotiate benefits — bonuses vacation time moving expenses timing of performance reviews stock options and the like — than salary.
Remember that you only have one shot at a counter proposal. You can’t do a second
one after the employer reacts to this one — so make sure you have everything you
want in this first counter proposal. If you’re comfortable make the counter proposal
in a follow-up interview; otherwise put the proposal in writing in the form of a letter.
And yes you could certainly wait for your first review — especially if it is in six months
– a much safer route but you will still have less negotiating power than you do right now.
Read many more strategies — and review a sample counter proposal letter — in this article
published on Quintessential Careers:
Job Offer Too Low?
Use These Key Salary Negotiation Techniques to Write a Counter Proposal Letter
.
And you can find many other resources and tools in the
salary negotiation
resources
section of Quintessential Careers.

;

Rebecca writes:
I just received an amazing offer letter from the company I would like to now
work with and I am in need of some advice. Regarding salary negotiation
what is the best way to try to get some of the other things you want from
your future employer? The offer is good but there are some other things that
I would like to ask for. Is it OK to ask and not have the employer think you
are being petty picky or too high-maintenance? Or would it be best to take
the offer as it is and then see at a 6-month review where you stand what
you’ve done for the revenue growth etc.



The Career Doctor responds:
Timing and finesse are everything in salary negotiation. Job-seekers should always try
to hold off salary negotiation to the very end — once you have convinced the employer
you are the one candidate who can fill the position. Ideally negotiation should begin
before an offer letter is sent though I know any number of employers that don’t
believe in negotiating until they send the letter or contract.
That said and assuming no other negotiation has taken place and that you have not
accepted the offer you are certainly in your right to make a counter proposal to your
prospective employer — however you must be prepared for any number of responses
including a retraction of the entire offer.
The key to a counter proposal just as with salary negotiation is research. Since you
seem okay with the salary but want to add/adjust some of the benefits research
comparable benefits within your industry at your level. Many employers are more
willing to renegotiate benefits — bonuses vacation time moving expenses timing of performance reviews stock options and the like — than salary.
Remember that you only have one shot at a counter proposal. You can’t do a second
one after the employer reacts to this one — so make sure you have everything you
want in this first counter proposal. If you’re comfortable make the counter proposal
in a follow-up interview; otherwise put the proposal in writing in the form of a letter.
And yes you could certainly wait for your first review — especially if it is in six months
– a much safer route but you will still have less negotiating power than you do right now.
Read many more strategies — and review a sample counter proposal letter — in this article
published on Quintessential Careers:
Job Offer Too Low?
Use These Key Salary Negotiation Techniques to Write a Counter Proposal Letter
.
And you can find many other resources and tools in the
salary negotiation
resources
section of Quintessential Careers.