Master’s Student Ready for Career Change


Delicia writes:
After graduating from college with a degree in psychology I got a job at a title
insurance company where I’ve been employed for the past 3 years. I am presently
working on a master’s degree and feel the need to change to a more promising
financially rewarding career. What should I do?



The Career Doctor responds:
Unfortunately I have no clue what type of job you currently hold what area
your graduate degree is in nor what your interests and goals are — besides
wanting something financially rewarding. I think most of us — at least those
not independently wealthy — want a financially rewarding career — so the key is
finding one that you are passionate about… a career and job that will make
you excited to head to work every morning.
Usually you get a master’s degree in the field that you see yourself entering. If
you are continuing your psychology at the graduate level then it certainly seems
that a counseling career is appropriate.
My best advice is to first sit down and reflect on who you are and what you like
doing. Perhaps conduct some research on a number of careers that interest you.
Then meet with one or more of the professors in your graduate program (or
perhaps even from your undergraduate days) and pick their brains about
career options. Finally once you have narrowed your career choices down
start making a plan for how you will make the change from what you are doing
now to your new career.
I recommend you read my article The
10-Step Plan to Career Change
published on Quintessential Careers. You might also
enjoy my Career Change Do’s and Don’ts

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Delicia writes:
After graduating from college with a degree in psychology I got a job at a title
insurance company where I’ve been employed for the past 3 years. I am presently
working on a master’s degree and feel the need to change to a more promising
financially rewarding career. What should I do?



The Career Doctor responds:
Unfortunately I have no clue what type of job you currently hold what area
your graduate degree is in nor what your interests and goals are — besides
wanting something financially rewarding. I think most of us — at least those
not independently wealthy — want a financially rewarding career — so the key is
finding one that you are passionate about… a career and job that will make
you excited to head to work every morning.
Usually you get a master’s degree in the field that you see yourself entering. If
you are continuing your psychology at the graduate level then it certainly seems
that a counseling career is appropriate.
My best advice is to first sit down and reflect on who you are and what you like
doing. Perhaps conduct some research on a number of careers that interest you.
Then meet with one or more of the professors in your graduate program (or
perhaps even from your undergraduate days) and pick their brains about
career options. Finally once you have narrowed your career choices down
start making a plan for how you will make the change from what you are doing
now to your new career.
I recommend you read my article The
10-Step Plan to Career Change
published on Quintessential Careers. You might also
enjoy my Career Change Do’s and Don’ts