Long-Distance Informational Interviews


Fiona writes:
I read the section on informational interviewing on your Website and
found it very helpful but I just have one question. What if the person
you want to interview is in another state or city and you can’t meet
them in person? What if they are usually very busy. Would it be
all right to interview them for information using email? Say have a
questionnaire for them to answer? Or would they just read it and
chuck it out because it is too impersonal? Help.



The Career Doctor responds:
Informational interviews are a great way to learn more about a career
field AND build your network of contacts. What is an informational
interview? It’s interviewing designed to produce information. What
kind of information? The information you need to choose or refine
a career path learn how to break in and find out if you have what it
takes to succeed. It’s the process of spending time with one of your
network contacts in a highly focused conversation that provides you
with key information you need to launch or boost your career.
The preferred method — the method where you get the best information
and the strongest possible connection with the person you are
interviewing — is through face-to-face interviews. However that
should not stop any job-seeker who is relocating and wants to
build a new network of contacts in a distant location. Technology makes it possible for you to simulate a face-to-face informational interview through apps like Skype and FaceTime.
And as you
mention job-seekers can also conduct informational interviews
by phone or e-mail.
The best strategy for you is to contact the person and ask his/her
preferred method of contact. If you choose email sending a list of questions — only AFTER the person
agrees to the informational interview — is acceptable but remember
to keep the list fairly short. Most people are willing to take the time
to help out job-seekers but not if it looks like it will take a huge
chunk of their time.
Finally ALWAYS remember to thank each person you interview.
Learn more here with the
Informational
Interviewing Tutorial
published on Quintessential Careers.

;

Fiona writes:
I read the section on informational interviewing on your Website and
found it very helpful but I just have one question. What if the person
you want to interview is in another state or city and you can’t meet
them in person? What if they are usually very busy. Would it be
all right to interview them for information using email? Say have a
questionnaire for them to answer? Or would they just read it and
chuck it out because it is too impersonal? Help.



The Career Doctor responds:
Informational interviews are a great way to learn more about a career
field AND build your network of contacts. What is an informational
interview? It’s interviewing designed to produce information. What
kind of information? The information you need to choose or refine
a career path learn how to break in and find out if you have what it
takes to succeed. It’s the process of spending time with one of your
network contacts in a highly focused conversation that provides you
with key information you need to launch or boost your career.
The preferred method — the method where you get the best information
and the strongest possible connection with the person you are
interviewing — is through face-to-face interviews. However that
should not stop any job-seeker who is relocating and wants to
build a new network of contacts in a distant location. Technology makes it possible for you to simulate a face-to-face informational interview through apps like Skype and FaceTime.
And as you
mention job-seekers can also conduct informational interviews
by phone or e-mail.
The best strategy for you is to contact the person and ask his/her
preferred method of contact. If you choose email sending a list of questions — only AFTER the person
agrees to the informational interview — is acceptable but remember
to keep the list fairly short. Most people are willing to take the time
to help out job-seekers but not if it looks like it will take a huge
chunk of their time.
Finally ALWAYS remember to thank each person you interview.
Learn more here with the
Informational
Interviewing Tutorial
published on Quintessential Careers.