Is it Good Etiquette to Follow Up on Resume Submission?


Jeanette writes:
Hi there. I am a current undergrad student upon the threshold of graduation
and am in the search of a job. I have compiled a resume and
sent it to one employer that posted a job I was very much interested in.
My question is focused on a matter of etiquette. It’s been perhaps 2 to 3
weeks since I submitted my resume and was wondering if it would be proper
and conducive to the exhibition of etiquette to call the employer and ask if
they received my resume and if so were interested? I would more so than
appreciate any advice you could give.


The Career Doctor responds:
You have great timing in sending your question because I just received an email from
Gina a hiring manager who complained about the prospective candidate who showed
up in the office unannounced a few days after his interview to check on his status
and while they met with him to not appear rude he just lost that job opportunity –
very bad job-seeking etiquette.
Your situation is quite different though and it gives me the opportunity to again
stress the importance of follow-up to all job-seekers. Please remember these
words if you want to succeed in finding a new job: follow up follow up follow up.
Following up job leads shows prospective employers your interest in the company
and position — and gives you another chance to sell your qualifications. Some job-seekers
fear sounding desperate or annoying when making follow-up inquiries but as long
as you do it right you will come across as interested not desperate.
You need to track down every job lead and keep on top of the status of each of
those leads. I recommend waiting no more than two weeks to follow-up with a
prospective employer… calling or emailing to make sure your resume was received
and get your name remembered.
Here are some other tips:

  • If you apply online for a position consider following-up the online application with a
    cover letter and resume sent to the hiring manager via postal mail. You will stand out over
    the other online applicants because few will also send a hard copy.

  • Keep your follow-up brief to the point and professional.
  • Focus your follow-up around your fit with the position and organization and your USP.
    You might also ask the hiring manager if he/she needs any further information not included
    in your original application.

  • If you recently completed training received an award or earned some other recognition
    that would make you an even better candidate for the position be sure to mention it in your follow-up.

  • Continue following-up regularly

For much more advice and tips read my article
Follow Up All Job Leads:
Don’t Wait by the Phone (or Computer)
published on Quintessential Careers.