How To Resign from Your Job Gracefully


Mary Jo writes:
I’ve been using your site a lot over the past few months and the resources you
offer helped me tremendously.
Here’s the thing: I’ve been offered a job did an assessment and accepted their
offer but can’t seem to locate information about giving notice and negotiating a
smooth transition with my current employer.
Am I not looking in the right places? Any help you could provide would be greatly
appreciated and thanks already for the help thus far.



The Career Doctor responds:
One of the most important rules — call it etiquette common sense whatever — that job-seekers
must always remember is to NEVER burn any bridges with previous employers. No matter
whether you hated the employer or your supervisor it is always best to leave on as pleasant
terms as possible. Job-hunting is a funny process and you never know when you’ll run smack
right into your former supervisor or former employer (through a merger or other circumstance).
So to make as smooth a transition from your current employer to your new one you’ll want to
act professionally and follow company guidelines. Specifically:

  • Timing. Give enough notice. The standard notice has traditionally been two weeks
    but you should consult your employee handbook in case your employer expects more advance warning.
  • Hiring. Offer to help your current employer find your replacement.
  • Training. Volunteer to train your replacement.
  • Working. Don’t disappear during the last weeks on the job. Stay an active member
    of the team.
  • Completing. Be sure to complete all open assignments and leave detailed progress
    reports for your supervisor and co-workers.
  • Leaving. Before walking out the door for the last time be sure you have contact
    information for key employees that you want to keep part of your network of contacts.

Finally when composing your letter of resignation — and yes always resign in writing — be professional.
Keep the letter or memo short and sweet and to the point. State your intention of leaving (giving a specific
last day) give reason for leaving (but only if you are comfortable doing so) and thank both your supervisor
and the company for the opportunities you have had working for them.
You should consider reading two articles on QuintCareers.com:
How to Resign From Your Job
Diplomatically
and Job
Resignations Do’s and Don’ts
.
Also be sure to check out these sample resignation letters.

;

Mary Jo writes:
I’ve been using your site a lot over the past few months and the resources you
offer helped me tremendously.
Here’s the thing: I’ve been offered a job did an assessment and accepted their
offer but can’t seem to locate information about giving notice and negotiating a
smooth transition with my current employer.
Am I not looking in the right places? Any help you could provide would be greatly
appreciated and thanks already for the help thus far.



The Career Doctor responds:
One of the most important rules — call it etiquette common sense whatever — that job-seekers
must always remember is to NEVER burn any bridges with previous employers. No matter
whether you hated the employer or your supervisor it is always best to leave on as pleasant
terms as possible. Job-hunting is a funny process and you never know when you’ll run smack
right into your former supervisor or former employer (through a merger or other circumstance).
So to make as smooth a transition from your current employer to your new one you’ll want to
act professionally and follow company guidelines. Specifically:

  • Timing. Give enough notice. The standard notice has traditionally been two weeks
    but you should consult your employee handbook in case your employer expects more advance warning.
  • Hiring. Offer to help your current employer find your replacement.
  • Training. Volunteer to train your replacement.
  • Working. Don’t disappear during the last weeks on the job. Stay an active member
    of the team.
  • Completing. Be sure to complete all open assignments and leave detailed progress
    reports for your supervisor and co-workers.
  • Leaving. Before walking out the door for the last time be sure you have contact
    information for key employees that you want to keep part of your network of contacts.

Finally when composing your letter of resignation — and yes always resign in writing — be professional.
Keep the letter or memo short and sweet and to the point. State your intention of leaving (giving a specific
last day) give reason for leaving (but only if you are comfortable doing so) and thank both your supervisor
and the company for the opportunities you have had working for them.
You should consider reading two articles on QuintCareers.com:
How to Resign From Your Job
Diplomatically
and Job
Resignations Do’s and Don’ts
.
Also be sure to check out these sample resignation letters.