How to Prepare for Performance Review


Amy writes:
I am a sales representative also in charge of all marketing and branding.
My 6-month review is next week and I want to go in prepared and confident.
I also want to ask for a raise. I have never had a review before and I’m nervous.
How can the employee best prepare herself for the review?



The Career Doctor responds:
It’s only natural to be a little nervous a bit anxious. The best advice I can give
you is to devise a strategy for the meeting. Go to the meeting prepared with
examples of your accomplishments and contributions and a plan for how you
will continue making those and more accomplishments in the future. You should
have a realistic idea of the size of the raise you want based on company policies
and what you’re worth in the marketplace.
Some other tips concerning asking for a raise:

  • Always remember to focus on the idea that you deserve a raise (and why)
    not that you need a raise.
  • Especially in this economy be flexible and open to other options besides a
    big raise. There are any number of options or perks you may be able to get instead
    of a raise (or a larger raise).
  • Be able to demonstrate your commitment to the department and organization
    by showing how you have taken on new projects acquired new skills etc.
  • Always be professional. Don’t make ultimatums whine or beg.
  • Raise your profile within the department and organization. We’re taught to be
    modest but no one is really going to know your accomplishments and contributions
    unless you broadcast them.
  • Remember that the rules of asking for a raise mirror that of salary negotiation –
    and always let the employer make the first raise offer.
  • Find a mentor in senior management who can be your advocate for future
    raises and promotions.
  • If you didn’t get the raise you wanted ask for suggestions on how you can
    improve and how you can make more contributions to the department and the organization.

You find other strategies in an article published on Quintessential Careers:
Getting the Raise You Deserve.

;

Amy writes:
I am a sales representative also in charge of all marketing and branding.
My 6-month review is next week and I want to go in prepared and confident.
I also want to ask for a raise. I have never had a review before and I’m nervous.
How can the employee best prepare herself for the review?



The Career Doctor responds:
It’s only natural to be a little nervous a bit anxious. The best advice I can give
you is to devise a strategy for the meeting. Go to the meeting prepared with
examples of your accomplishments and contributions and a plan for how you
will continue making those and more accomplishments in the future. You should
have a realistic idea of the size of the raise you want based on company policies
and what you’re worth in the marketplace.
Some other tips concerning asking for a raise:

  • Always remember to focus on the idea that you deserve a raise (and why)
    not that you need a raise.
  • Especially in this economy be flexible and open to other options besides a
    big raise. There are any number of options or perks you may be able to get instead
    of a raise (or a larger raise).
  • Be able to demonstrate your commitment to the department and organization
    by showing how you have taken on new projects acquired new skills etc.
  • Always be professional. Don’t make ultimatums whine or beg.
  • Raise your profile within the department and organization. We’re taught to be
    modest but no one is really going to know your accomplishments and contributions
    unless you broadcast them.
  • Remember that the rules of asking for a raise mirror that of salary negotiation –
    and always let the employer make the first raise offer.
  • Find a mentor in senior management who can be your advocate for future
    raises and promotions.
  • If you didn’t get the raise you wanted ask for suggestions on how you can
    improve and how you can make more contributions to the department and the organization.

You find other strategies in an article published on Quintessential Careers:
Getting the Raise You Deserve.