How to Break Into Teaching


Lamar writes:
Dr. Hansen: I am looking for a new career in teaching. I have a master of arts degree
in interdisciplinary technology from Eastern Michigan University with a minor in
business. Just how do I break into this field without having a doctorial degree or
the experience in teaching besides being a part-time substitute teacher?



The Career Doctor responds:
I guess it really depends on what level you wish to teach. If you wish to teach
K-12 then the combination of experience and a master’s degree will take
you far in getting your foot in the door. You’ll also need to earn a teaching certification for whatever state where you are seeking a job. Certainly there
is a shortage of teachers in many parts of the country — and because
technology has become such an important part of the curriculum
someone with your credentials should be in high demand. Don’t
discount yourself or your credentials; focus on the positive!
If you want to break into the college ranks your best bets are community colleges and temporary positions at four-year schools. Many community
colleges are more flexible in their hiring criteria and look at a mix of
degrees and experience thus you should find numerous permanent
positions. But because technology is also in such demand at the
college level and because there is a limited number of qualified candidates there may also be numerous offerings for instructor-level
positions. In the end if you want to teach full-time at the college level
you are going to have to seriously consider getting your doctoral degree.
So your next step? Regardless of the level you want to teach your next
step is to begin developing your network. Join an industry professional organization (and join a discussion group and/or attend a conference)
talk with your professors about contacts in the field track down alumni
and check with family and friends who may have connections to teaching.
There are also numerous excellent job sites on the Web related to all
levels of teaching. At a minimum you can begin reading job descriptions
and requirements and better position yourself as an ideal candidate as
you develop your list of prospective employers. Follow this link on
Quintessential Careers: Academic
Educator and Teaching Jobs
.

;

Lamar writes:
Dr. Hansen: I am looking for a new career in teaching. I have a master of arts degree
in interdisciplinary technology from Eastern Michigan University with a minor in
business. Just how do I break into this field without having a doctorial degree or
the experience in teaching besides being a part-time substitute teacher?



The Career Doctor responds:
I guess it really depends on what level you wish to teach. If you wish to teach
K-12 then the combination of experience and a master’s degree will take
you far in getting your foot in the door. You’ll also need to earn a teaching certification for whatever state where you are seeking a job. Certainly there
is a shortage of teachers in many parts of the country — and because
technology has become such an important part of the curriculum
someone with your credentials should be in high demand. Don’t
discount yourself or your credentials; focus on the positive!
If you want to break into the college ranks your best bets are community colleges and temporary positions at four-year schools. Many community
colleges are more flexible in their hiring criteria and look at a mix of
degrees and experience thus you should find numerous permanent
positions. But because technology is also in such demand at the
college level and because there is a limited number of qualified candidates there may also be numerous offerings for instructor-level
positions. In the end if you want to teach full-time at the college level
you are going to have to seriously consider getting your doctoral degree.
So your next step? Regardless of the level you want to teach your next
step is to begin developing your network. Join an industry professional organization (and join a discussion group and/or attend a conference)
talk with your professors about contacts in the field track down alumni
and check with family and friends who may have connections to teaching.
There are also numerous excellent job sites on the Web related to all
levels of teaching. At a minimum you can begin reading job descriptions
and requirements and better position yourself as an ideal candidate as
you develop your list of prospective employers. Follow this link on
Quintessential Careers: Academic
Educator and Teaching Jobs
.