How Interested Are Employers in Career Portfolios?


Anonymous writes:
I believe the career portfolio is an important job search tool; however many of my
co-workers are not convinced. I want to know some statistics that will reveal that
many employers are actually interested in interview candidates who come to the
interview with a career portfolio. I am a business technology teacher at the secondary
level and I teach my students job readiness skills. We will be creating career portfolios
in all of the classes I teach this fall. I would like the other teachers to do this as well.
I am the business department chair and I want to provide some information that
explains how powerful a tool the career portfolio really is.
I have visited lots of sites but I do not see info that tells me which businesses in
particular are using or want their applicants to come with a career portfolio. Can
you help me help my students and other educators at the secondary level?



The Career Doctor responds:
Unfortunately I cannot give you the statistics on the number of employers
who require or are interested in career portfolios. I can however state that I
am a big proponent of career portfolios because they are just another selling
tool in the job-seeker’s career toolbox. A resume states what someone has
accomplished but a portfolio can actually show it! There is nothing more
powerful in my mind than pulling out a hefty portfolio of your work and placing
it on the interviewer’s desk with a resounding “thump.”
And while career portfolios have traditionally been used by job-seekers in the
arts more and more job-seekers across all disciplines are using them as a
way to develop a career focus document experiences and accomplishments and as an aid for prepping for job interviews.
In fact one of my colleagues actually supports the development of two portfolios
an external portfolio used for job-hunting purposes and an internal one used for
career development.
All businesses ideally want job-seekers with experience and a portfolio is the tool
to document that experience. Things that can be included in a career portfolio
include:

  • Resume(s)
  • Career Goals/Objectives/Summary
  • List of accomplishments
  • Samples of work and reports
  • Awards and honors
  • Professional development activities
  • Reference list

Just one final note: Do not send portfolios to employers unsolicited; job-seekers
should bring portfolios with you to the interview.
Read more about career and job-search portfolios in this article published on
Quintessential Careers: Your
Job Skills Portfolio: Giving You an Edge in the Marketplace
.

;

Anonymous writes:
I believe the career portfolio is an important job search tool; however many of my
co-workers are not convinced. I want to know some statistics that will reveal that
many employers are actually interested in interview candidates who come to the
interview with a career portfolio. I am a business technology teacher at the secondary
level and I teach my students job readiness skills. We will be creating career portfolios
in all of the classes I teach this fall. I would like the other teachers to do this as well.
I am the business department chair and I want to provide some information that
explains how powerful a tool the career portfolio really is.
I have visited lots of sites but I do not see info that tells me which businesses in
particular are using or want their applicants to come with a career portfolio. Can
you help me help my students and other educators at the secondary level?



The Career Doctor responds:
Unfortunately I cannot give you the statistics on the number of employers
who require or are interested in career portfolios. I can however state that I
am a big proponent of career portfolios because they are just another selling
tool in the job-seeker’s career toolbox. A resume states what someone has
accomplished but a portfolio can actually show it! There is nothing more
powerful in my mind than pulling out a hefty portfolio of your work and placing
it on the interviewer’s desk with a resounding “thump.”
And while career portfolios have traditionally been used by job-seekers in the
arts more and more job-seekers across all disciplines are using them as a
way to develop a career focus document experiences and accomplishments and as an aid for prepping for job interviews.
In fact one of my colleagues actually supports the development of two portfolios
an external portfolio used for job-hunting purposes and an internal one used for
career development.
All businesses ideally want job-seekers with experience and a portfolio is the tool
to document that experience. Things that can be included in a career portfolio
include:

  • Resume(s)
  • Career Goals/Objectives/Summary
  • List of accomplishments
  • Samples of work and reports
  • Awards and honors
  • Professional development activities
  • Reference list

Just one final note: Do not send portfolios to employers unsolicited; job-seekers
should bring portfolios with you to the interview.
Read more about career and job-search portfolios in this article published on
Quintessential Careers: Your
Job Skills Portfolio: Giving You an Edge in the Marketplace
.