Guidelines for Gen Y Workers Seeking Job Change


David writes:

I’ve been at my job almost two years… since right out of college. I feel
bored and ready to move on but am not sure how to proceed. I know I should be happy to have a job but I need a change – and a change of employers as my current one is too restrictive about social networking. What are your suggestions?


The Career Doctor responds:

First take some comfort because you are NOT alone! Many younger
Schawbel-PromoteYourselfworkers struggle at first with finding their ideal job and employer(s).

And while you are one of the luckier of your peers with a good job a job that does not offer fulfillment and advancement is far from ideal.

Here’s what I suggest you do:

  1. Conduct a skills (hard and soft) and interests self-assessment. For skills identify your strengths and make a plan to improve your weaknesses. For interests focus on those that can tie to current or new career direction(s).
  2. Research careers that interest you – and for which you are (or could be) qualified.
  3. Research employers that have a corporate culture that better fits your needs. Read more about corporate culture in this article on Quintessential Careers.
  4. Review your accomplishments. Do not focus on your job duties but on ways you succeeded in helping your employer. Read more about accomplishments in this article on Quintessential Careers.
  5. Decide your next career step. Better develop your career plan. Read more about career planning in this article on Quintessential Careers.
  6. Develop a laser-sharp resume that identifies you as an accomplished worker. Find LOTS of resume resources on Quintessential Careers.
  7. Edit enhance and sharpen your professional profiles on Facebook LinkedIn Google+ Twitter and your blog or Website – or whichever of these social tools you currently use for building your brand.
  8. Look within your current employer for openings that match your new career goal.
  9. Look for job openings with your targeted employers.
  10. Use your social and professional network to assist you in developing new contacts and job leads within your targeted employers.
  11. Apply to jobs. Follow-up.

If you are close to your current boss you could also add a step in which you have an informal (ideally off-premises) discussion about your future – and what you can do to get promoted or transferred.

You can find tools resources and advice to do all these steps on Quintessential Careers the site I founded. We have extensive resources – and I have included links to several of them within my response.

Another great resource I have discovered especially for folks in your generation is Dan Schawbel’s (a Gen Y himself) new book Promote Yourself: The New Rules for Career Success. While Dan is indeed a career/personal branding and reputation expert the book is much bigger than just helping you manage your brand. One of the things I love about Dan’s book is that he provides you with key advice to take charge of your future to mold who you are how you want to be perceived and how to land that next job. His book basically covers most of the steps I outlined above.

Read my full review of his book on Quintessential Careers.