Getting Into a Marine Biology Career


Gina writes:
I’m interested in pursuing marine biology as a career and I know it’s very
hard career wise to get into. Any information regarding fields careers jobs
and colleges related to marine biology or marine science would help. Thanks



The Career Doctor responds:
I don’t know your definition of hard but from most of the resources I have
seen and the people I have talked with a career in marine biology requires
at least a master’s degree…so there is definitely a lot of hard work and
schooling involved.
A career in marine biology can take several paths. You could work in a private
or government lab performing research (e.g. Scientists in the Marine Biology Research Division at Scripps investigate the ecological physiological cellular
and biochemical characteristics of marine bacteria plants and animals etc.)
teach work outdoors and/or underwater or even in an office. Chances are you
would work in a number of these at various times.
Career paths within marine biology include biotechnologist toxicologist aquaculturist microbiologist ecologist marine educator fisheries biologist mammalogist algologist behaviorist marine pathologist aquarist and parasitologist.
While still in high school focus on math and science courses. In choosing
colleges you can look for schools that have a marine biology major for undergraduates
but most of the graduate programs in marine biology do not require it to be your major
so you could also look at schools that have a strong science program (or pre-med
program) with majors such as biology biochemistry chemistry.
And while in college focus on trying to get one or more internships related to
marine biology.
Finally remember that interests change so take your time in researching the
career and in taking your college courses. And if you decide along the way that
marine biology is not for you don’t panic; instead simply spend some time reflecting
on the things that do interest you.
You can find an amazing number of links to marine biology resources from the folks
at the Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University. Go to:
Career Information.

;

Gina writes:
I’m interested in pursuing marine biology as a career and I know it’s very
hard career wise to get into. Any information regarding fields careers jobs
and colleges related to marine biology or marine science would help. Thanks



The Career Doctor responds:
I don’t know your definition of hard but from most of the resources I have
seen and the people I have talked with a career in marine biology requires
at least a master’s degree…so there is definitely a lot of hard work and
schooling involved.
A career in marine biology can take several paths. You could work in a private
or government lab performing research (e.g. Scientists in the Marine Biology Research Division at Scripps investigate the ecological physiological cellular
and biochemical characteristics of marine bacteria plants and animals etc.)
teach work outdoors and/or underwater or even in an office. Chances are you
would work in a number of these at various times.
Career paths within marine biology include biotechnologist toxicologist aquaculturist microbiologist ecologist marine educator fisheries biologist mammalogist algologist behaviorist marine pathologist aquarist and parasitologist.
While still in high school focus on math and science courses. In choosing
colleges you can look for schools that have a marine biology major for undergraduates
but most of the graduate programs in marine biology do not require it to be your major
so you could also look at schools that have a strong science program (or pre-med
program) with majors such as biology biochemistry chemistry.
And while in college focus on trying to get one or more internships related to
marine biology.
Finally remember that interests change so take your time in researching the
career and in taking your college courses. And if you decide along the way that
marine biology is not for you don’t panic; instead simply spend some time reflecting
on the things that do interest you.
You can find an amazing number of links to marine biology resources from the folks
at the Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University. Go to:
Career Information.