Followup Needed When Employer Sends Mixed Signals


Cathy writes:
I am seeking advice for my husband. He had an interview for a position which
he thought went well and was also told it was a good meeting. He was called
back for a second interview. But the night before the interview he received a
message on our answering machine saying that the meeting was being canceled.
It has now been one week and he has heard nothing. The agency that was working
with him only knew that the meeting was canceled. At this point does he “write
off” this company as a potential employer or should he follow it up in some way?



The Career Doctor responds:
I see a couple of red flags in your email and my gut feeling is that it is time
for your husband to explore other options but let’s go through this thing step-by-step.
First when using a recruiter or headhunter that person becomes a key point
of contact. Just remember that the recruiter works for the employer (and not
you) and you should be okay. The recruiter only gets paid for placing a job-seeker
with a client company so there are obvious reasons why the recruiter wants to work
with you in helping you land the position. Always follow-up any contact with
employers with the recruiter and get his or her feedback on your performance
and perceptions of where you stand with the employer.
Second job-seekers should always send thank-you notes after all interviews — to
each person who interviewed you. While not always seen as a requirement thank
you letters can push you ahead of the other candidates — give you a little edge.
Third always follow-up with employers — and recruiters. Who knows why the employer
canceled the interview? Perhaps they filled the position; perhaps they implemented a
hiring freeze; perhaps they received a bad reference about your husband. Information
is key. By following-up the next day after getting the message he might be in a better
position of knowing where he stood — and where the search stood. He should have also
called the recruiter if for no other reason than to update him/her on the progress of
the search. Follow-up is key. Job-seekers must follow-up on all job leads.
I wouldn’t necessarily write off this company — there is still time to make contact and
see where the search stands — but I would certainly be moving forward with other potential
employers because something obviously happened with this company. And your husband
should decide whether to keep working with the recruiter.
Finally remember that networking is the best — and most likely — way to find a job. So
be sure to let all the people in your network know you are looking for a new opportunity.
For more resources related to recruiters and headhunters including useful advice and
recruiter directories go to this section of Quintessential Careers:
Recruiter/Headhunter
Resources Directories & Associations
.

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Cathy writes:
I am seeking advice for my husband. He had an interview for a position which
he thought went well and was also told it was a good meeting. He was called
back for a second interview. But the night before the interview he received a
message on our answering machine saying that the meeting was being canceled.
It has now been one week and he has heard nothing. The agency that was working
with him only knew that the meeting was canceled. At this point does he “write
off” this company as a potential employer or should he follow it up in some way?



The Career Doctor responds:
I see a couple of red flags in your email and my gut feeling is that it is time
for your husband to explore other options but let’s go through this thing step-by-step.
First when using a recruiter or headhunter that person becomes a key point
of contact. Just remember that the recruiter works for the employer (and not
you) and you should be okay. The recruiter only gets paid for placing a job-seeker
with a client company so there are obvious reasons why the recruiter wants to work
with you in helping you land the position. Always follow-up any contact with
employers with the recruiter and get his or her feedback on your performance
and perceptions of where you stand with the employer.
Second job-seekers should always send thank-you notes after all interviews — to
each person who interviewed you. While not always seen as a requirement thank
you letters can push you ahead of the other candidates — give you a little edge.
Third always follow-up with employers — and recruiters. Who knows why the employer
canceled the interview? Perhaps they filled the position; perhaps they implemented a
hiring freeze; perhaps they received a bad reference about your husband. Information
is key. By following-up the next day after getting the message he might be in a better
position of knowing where he stood — and where the search stood. He should have also
called the recruiter if for no other reason than to update him/her on the progress of
the search. Follow-up is key. Job-seekers must follow-up on all job leads.
I wouldn’t necessarily write off this company — there is still time to make contact and
see where the search stands — but I would certainly be moving forward with other potential
employers because something obviously happened with this company. And your husband
should decide whether to keep working with the recruiter.
Finally remember that networking is the best — and most likely — way to find a job. So
be sure to let all the people in your network know you are looking for a new opportunity.
For more resources related to recruiters and headhunters including useful advice and
recruiter directories go to this section of Quintessential Careers:
Recruiter/Headhunter
Resources Directories & Associations
.