Follow Up After Dropping Off Resume?


Crystalaura writes:
I found your website through a search on Google for job-search etiquette. I found the
Job-Hunting Etiquette Quiz to be very informative.
I have a question that I did not see addressed on this or any other site. I have
recently (three days ago) submitted a resume for a job I am very interested in. I
dropped the resume off in person although I left it with the receptionist and did
not speak to the person in charge of hiring.
I have not heard from them yet. I think my qualifications closely match the job
posted and I really really want the job.
Is it appropriate for me to follow up with a phone call or do I have to wait for
them to contact me?



The Career Doctor responds:
It’s only been a few days but should you follow-up? Yes! I won’t say the job-seeker
who shows the most interest will get the job but certainly that job-seeker will be
noticed above others who did not bother to follow-up. Call the hiring manager today
on the pretense of checking to be sure he or she received your resume. While
on the phone express your interest in the job and your match with the requirements
of the job — and be sure to ask about the hiring timetable.
The cliché that fits in job-seeking — unless abused — is that the squeaky wheel
gets the grease; in other words the job-seeker who follows-up — who shows
interest in the job and the company — will get more attention than other applicants.
Don’t overdo it though; don’t call everyday. But please do follow up on a regular
basis. And as employment hiring cycles stretch out don’t let the silence from the
employer keep you from checking in and continuing to show your interest.
One more comment. When you dropped off your resume did it include a cover letter
addressed specifically to the hiring manager? If not I suggest that you immediately
send a follow-up thank-you letter once you’ve called the hiring manager for the first
time; it may not be as effective as if you had sent it originally but you can again
thank the manager for talking with you on the phone and you can say again how
well your qualifications match the job requirements. Remember that common
courtesy and etiquette go a long way in job-hunting.