Double Major Needs Help with Career Choice


Patricia writes:
Hi! I need some advice. I am a college student about to enter my junior year though I am a double major so I will need to go a fifth year (I have three years left). My problem is simply that both my majors are fields that require master’s degrees. I will not be able to afford graduate school right away so my question is whether there is a good job out there you can suggest that utilizes one or both of my degrees until I can afford graduate school get a master’s and really enter into one of the fields.
My majors are 1) psychology and 2) speech/language pathology and audiology. These are both fields that I am highly interested in. Is there something I can do with a bachelor’s degree in each field? Something that can support me through graduate school? I would appreciate any suggestions you can give me. I’m just scared that I will graduate with two degrees and have gone through five years of school and yet have no career. Thank you so much.


The Career Doctor responds:
Wow. You are quite ambitious — and I offer my full support of your efforts. It’s great to see a college student doing some career planning so early! It’s good to see that you are planning ahead thinking about your career both prior to and after graduate school. So…let me suggest a plan for you that has several steps.
First do some self-assessment. What is it that you really want to do with your life? What are your short-term and long-term goals? How would you like to combine your interests and majors?
Second talk with your two major advisers. Talk with them about your concerns for a career prior to attending graduate school. Ask about options for fellowships and other grants that may pay for all or most of your graduate work. All of my graduate school expenses were covered by research and teaching fellowships.
Third go to the career services office of your college. These professionals are ready and able to help you tackle all these issues from helping you define a clearer vision of your career to potential internships to help with finding employment upon graduation to guidance about graduate programs and financing. We have a
great article on the subject: It’s Never Too Early — or Too Late — to Visit Your College Career Office. The article is written by Mary Keen Krikorian of Hartwick College.
Fourth go to the Web and do some exploring. You can start at the Career Exploration
section of Quintessential Careers.
Just remember that you have plenty of time — three years — so don’t get too worried. If you follow the steps I’ve outlined you’ll get (or find) lots of great advice and have a much stronger and clearer plan for your future (which could still change again during the next three years!). Good luck.
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