Desperate Job-seeker Poo-poohs Networking


Anonymous writes:
Network. Network. Network.
I followed all the networking and other advice you and every other career guru offers.
I’ve been out of work for more than two years now. Nobody in my network will return my phone
calls or emails anymore because of course they all have jobs so they can’t understand
why I don’t. They’re tired of hearing about me not having a job. They’ve asked me not to
give their names as references anymore because they’re tired of all the phone calls from
people who end up not hiring me anyway. Without references I don’t have a chance of
finding work.
I have no job and I’m so demoralized that I don’t even have it in me anymore to bother to
look for one. I have no friends left. I spend every moment of every day by myself. I have
nobody to talk to. And oh yeah I have a truckload of skills training and experience
going to waste.



The Career Doctor responds:
First let me state how sorry I am that you are in your current situation. I think
desperation and poor job-search techniques have had a hand in your stretch of unemployment.
There is a fine line between using your network and abusing your network. People
in your network aren’t the ones who will hire you; networking is based on
the premise that we live in a small world and our network serves as our ears for the
potential job openings. I’m not hiring but I just heard that Company X is in need of
someone with your qualifications so I give you a call and let you know about the
opening. Networking is and probably always will be the most powerful tool
of job-hunting — when used correctly.
There is no question you are desperate — and I feel for you. But you have to
understand that hiring managers do not hire people who are desperate for a job –
any job — hiring managers want job-seekers who are a good fit and have an interest
in the job and the company.
And I think you are still traumatized — on some level — by getting downsized. Just about
everyone gets fired or downsized at some point in their careers and you need to find
a way to put that behind you and move forward. There is no stigma — unless you put
one on yourself.
At one point you WERE getting interviews but I am guessing your desperation or
trauma over being fired was telegraphed to the interviewer — and that’s why you never
received a call back or a job offer.
My best advice? You need counseling. Call your alma mater and speak with a
career professional. If you don’t want to do that see if there is a one-stop career center in your area. These publicly funded career centers can help you regain the
confidence you need and rebuild your skills so that you can get a new job and
begin rebuilding your life.
Use this URL to find a local government-sponsored career center:
Career One-Stop Center Service Locator.
For more advice on networking go to this section of Quintessential Careers:
The Art of Networking.

;

Anonymous writes:
Network. Network. Network.
I followed all the networking and other advice you and every other career guru offers.
I’ve been out of work for more than two years now. Nobody in my network will return my phone
calls or emails anymore because of course they all have jobs so they can’t understand
why I don’t. They’re tired of hearing about me not having a job. They’ve asked me not to
give their names as references anymore because they’re tired of all the phone calls from
people who end up not hiring me anyway. Without references I don’t have a chance of
finding work.
I have no job and I’m so demoralized that I don’t even have it in me anymore to bother to
look for one. I have no friends left. I spend every moment of every day by myself. I have
nobody to talk to. And oh yeah I have a truckload of skills training and experience
going to waste.



The Career Doctor responds:
First let me state how sorry I am that you are in your current situation. I think
desperation and poor job-search techniques have had a hand in your stretch of unemployment.
There is a fine line between using your network and abusing your network. People
in your network aren’t the ones who will hire you; networking is based on
the premise that we live in a small world and our network serves as our ears for the
potential job openings. I’m not hiring but I just heard that Company X is in need of
someone with your qualifications so I give you a call and let you know about the
opening. Networking is and probably always will be the most powerful tool
of job-hunting — when used correctly.
There is no question you are desperate — and I feel for you. But you have to
understand that hiring managers do not hire people who are desperate for a job –
any job — hiring managers want job-seekers who are a good fit and have an interest
in the job and the company.
And I think you are still traumatized — on some level — by getting downsized. Just about
everyone gets fired or downsized at some point in their careers and you need to find
a way to put that behind you and move forward. There is no stigma — unless you put
one on yourself.
At one point you WERE getting interviews but I am guessing your desperation or
trauma over being fired was telegraphed to the interviewer — and that’s why you never
received a call back or a job offer.
My best advice? You need counseling. Call your alma mater and speak with a
career professional. If you don’t want to do that see if there is a one-stop career center in your area. These publicly funded career centers can help you regain the
confidence you need and rebuild your skills so that you can get a new job and
begin rebuilding your life.
Use this URL to find a local government-sponsored career center:
Career One-Stop Center Service Locator.
For more advice on networking go to this section of Quintessential Careers:
The Art of Networking.