Assessments to Gauge True Potential


Kimberly writes:
I am in the process of going back to school to pursue a
career as a nurse. I was hoping that you could give me a web site that offers
career assessment tests. It would be nice to see if this is where my true
potential lies.



The Career Doctor responds:
I am a big believer in the use of assessment tests — but only as a small
part of a much broader self-assessment self-reflection exercise. So while
there are plenty of self-assessments tests (both online and in print; some
free some fee-based) I think you might be better served by spending some
time looking at what made you consider nursing researching nursing careers
that interest you and then if you still want to taking an assessment test.
Nursing is one of those caring professions where a big part of who you are
must be about helping people — and their families. Besides the technical skills
necessary you must also have strong empathy skills. And even though
nurses and other healthcare professionals continue to be in demand you
also need to expect to work long hours in almost any nursing situation.
According to the American Nurses Association: “Nursing has many definitions
but the essence of nursing is that nurses combine the art of caring with the
science of health care. Nursing places its focus not only on a particular health
problem but on the whole patient and his or her response to treatment. Care
of the patient and a firm base of scientific knowledge are indispensable elements.”
Read more.
Is nursing right for you? Make a list of the activities and interests that excite
and motivate you. Then make a list of those things you never want to do again.
Then review your aptitude for science and medicine. From these activities you
should have a good picture if nursing is right for you. You also need to decide
not only the type of nursing specialty you wish to pursue but also where you
want to practice your nursing.
And to help you better understand the specifics of different types of nursing careers
conduct some research. One of the best sources I have found on the many
many facets of a career in nursing is the career section of
NurseWeek.com where you
can read details about more than 40 career paths in nursing. These details include
things such as career overview education and certifications needed job outlook
typical venues and more. A great resource.
Finally you can review the types of job postings for nurses and other healthcare
professionals by following some of the links we have in this section of Quintessential
Careers: Jobs in Health Care Medicine Pharmaceuticals and Social Work.

;

Kimberly writes:
I am in the process of going back to school to pursue a
career as a nurse. I was hoping that you could give me a web site that offers
career assessment tests. It would be nice to see if this is where my true
potential lies.



The Career Doctor responds:
I am a big believer in the use of assessment tests — but only as a small
part of a much broader self-assessment self-reflection exercise. So while
there are plenty of self-assessments tests (both online and in print; some
free some fee-based) I think you might be better served by spending some
time looking at what made you consider nursing researching nursing careers
that interest you and then if you still want to taking an assessment test.
Nursing is one of those caring professions where a big part of who you are
must be about helping people — and their families. Besides the technical skills
necessary you must also have strong empathy skills. And even though
nurses and other healthcare professionals continue to be in demand you
also need to expect to work long hours in almost any nursing situation.
According to the American Nurses Association: “Nursing has many definitions
but the essence of nursing is that nurses combine the art of caring with the
science of health care. Nursing places its focus not only on a particular health
problem but on the whole patient and his or her response to treatment. Care
of the patient and a firm base of scientific knowledge are indispensable elements.”
Read more.
Is nursing right for you? Make a list of the activities and interests that excite
and motivate you. Then make a list of those things you never want to do again.
Then review your aptitude for science and medicine. From these activities you
should have a good picture if nursing is right for you. You also need to decide
not only the type of nursing specialty you wish to pursue but also where you
want to practice your nursing.
And to help you better understand the specifics of different types of nursing careers
conduct some research. One of the best sources I have found on the many
many facets of a career in nursing is the career section of
NurseWeek.com where you
can read details about more than 40 career paths in nursing. These details include
things such as career overview education and certifications needed job outlook
typical venues and more. A great resource.
Finally you can review the types of job postings for nurses and other healthcare
professionals by following some of the links we have in this section of Quintessential
Careers: Jobs in Health Care Medicine Pharmaceuticals and Social Work.