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Alabama

Alabama

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Alabama, you can file a claim at the Alabama Department of Labor’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Alabama law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing due to misconduct related to your job makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment).

You must have made a certain amount of money during your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To be eligible for benefits, you must have:

  • Worked at least two quarters during your base period;
  • Earned at least one-and-a-half times your earnings (throughout the entire base period) in the highest-paid quarter of the period; and
  • Garnered an average quarterly earning of at least $1,157.01 during the two highest-paid quarters of the base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Alabama residents can collect unemployment benefits for 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Benefits per week range from a minimum of $45 to a maximum of $265 calculated using your base period earnings.

Alaska

Alaska

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Alaska, you can file a claim at the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Alaska law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing due to misconduct related to your job makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will disqualify you from receiving unemployment benefits for six weeks unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment). You may be able to collect benefits if you quit due to compelling personal reasons, such as caring for an ill family member.

In Alaska, you qualify for benefits if you have earned at least $2,500 in two quarters of your base period. There are two types of base periods: regular base period and alternate base period. Your regular base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019,, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. The alternative base period is simply the last four completed quarters before your claim’s effective date.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Alaska residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 16 to 26 weeks, depending on how evenly spread your earnings were throughout the base period, and may collect for a longer period during times of unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Benefits range from $56 per week to $370 per week. You may also collect $24 per week per dependent up to three dependents.

Arizona

Arizona

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Arizona, you can file a claim at the Arizona Department of Economic Security’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Arizona law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing due to misconduct related to your job makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment). You may be able to collect benefits if you quit due to compelling personal reasons, such as caring for an ill family member.

In Arizona, you qualify for benefits if you have earned at least 390 times the Arizona minimum wage during the highest-paid quarter and at least half that amount in the other three quarters of the base period combined, and earned at least $7,000 in two combined quarters of the base period, with at least $5,987.50 earned in one of those quarters. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Arizona residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with an extension during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Benefits range from $120 per week to $240 per week.

Arkansas

Arkansas

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Arkansas, you can file a claim at the Arkansas Division of Workforce Services’ website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Arkansas law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing due to misconduct related to your job makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment). You may be able to collect benefits if you quit due to compelling personal reasons, such as caring for an ill family member.

In Arkansas, you qualify for benefits if you have earned wages in at least two quarters of the base period and at least 35 times your weekly benefit amount during the entire base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Arkansas residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 25 weeks, with an extension during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Benefits range from $81 per week to $451 per week.

California

California

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in California, you can file a claim at the California Employment Development Department’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by California law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing due to misconduct related to your job makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In California, you must meet one of the two following requirements:
You must have earned at least $1,300 in your highest-paid quarter of the base period.

  • You must have earned at least $900 in your highest-paid quarter of the base period and at least one-and-a-quarter times your earnings in the highest-paid quarter during the entire base period.
  • You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment.

Duration of Benefits

California residents can collect full unemployment benefits for between 12 and 26 weeks, varying based on total earnings during the base period.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Benefits range from $40 per week to $450 per week.

Colorado

Colorado

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Colorado, you can file a claim at the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Colorado law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing due to “gross misconduct” related to your job makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment). You may be able to collect benefits if you quit due to compelling personal reasons, such as caring for an ill family member.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019,, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Colorado, you must have made at least $2,500 during the base period to qualify.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Colorado residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Your benefit caps out at $561 per week.

Connecticut

Connecticut

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Connecticut, you can file a claim at the Connecticut Department of Labor and Employment’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Connecticut law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing due to “willful misconduct” related to your job makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment). You may be able to collect benefits if you quit due to compelling personal reasons, such as caring for an ill family member.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Connecticut, in order to be eligible, you must have earned at least 40 times the weekly benefit rate.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Connecticut residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Your benefit caps out at $594 per week.

Delaware

Delaware

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Delaware, you can file a claim at the Delaware Division of Labor Insurance’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Delaware law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing that had a just cause (e.g., violating company policy) makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment). You may be able to collect benefits if you quit due to compelling personal reasons, such as caring for an ill family member.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Delaware, in order to be eligible, you must have earned at least 36 times your weekly benefit amount during the full base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Connecticut residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Your benefit ranges from $20 per week to $330 per week.

Florida

Florida

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Florida, you can file a claim at the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Florida law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment). You may be able to collect benefits if you quit due to compelling personal reasons, such as caring for an ill family member.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Florida, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have earned wages in at least two of the four quarters during base period.
  • You must have earned at least $3,400 during full base period.
  • Your total base period earnings must be more than one-and-a-half times the highest wage quarter.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Florida residents can collect unemployment benefits for somewhere between 12 to 23 weeks, depending on Florida’s employment rate. In 2018 and 2019, you could only claim benefits for 12 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to $275 per week.

Georgia

Georgia

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Georgia, you can file a claim at the Georgia Department of Labor’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Georgia law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless there was a material change in your working relationship (e.g., your employer didn’t pay you). Unlike many other states, there are no personal reasons for quitting that allow you to collect benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Georgia, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have insured wages in at least two quarters of the base period.
  • Your insured wages must equal at least $1,134 in the two highest quarters of the base period.
  • Your insured wages during the base period must equal at least one-and-a-half times the highest quarter of earnings.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Georgia residents can collect unemployment benefits for between 14 weeks and 20 weeks, depending on the unemployment rate.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $44 per week and $330 per week.

Hawaii

Hawaii

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Hawaii, you can file a claim at the Hawaii Unemployment Insurance Division’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Hawaii law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Hawaii, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have wages in at least two quarters of the base period.
  • You must have wages of least 26 times your weekly benefit amount in your base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Hawaii residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

In 2019, you could receive somewhere between $5 per week and $630 per week.

Idaho

Idaho

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Idaho, you can file a claim at the Idaho Department of Labor’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Idaho law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless your work environment had become so hostile you felt you had to leave (e.g., sexual harassment).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Idaho, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have worked and been paid wages in at least two of the quarters in the base period.
  • You must have been paid at least $1,872 in wages in one of those quarters.
  • The total wages paid in your base period must equal one-and-a-quarter times your highest quarter wages.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Idaho residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive somewhere between $72 per week and $405 per week.

Illinois

Illinois

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Illinois, you can file a claim at the Illinois Department of Employment Security’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Illinois law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove a change in your wages, hours, or working conditions work was so compelling, you were forced to leave.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Illinois, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You were paid $1,600 or more in wages during your base period.
  • You were paid at least $440 of your total outside of your highest quarter.

Illinois offers an alternative base period for people who don’t qualify for the main base period. The alternative is the last four completed quarters before the person files for unemployment.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Illinois residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive up to $471 per week.

Indiana

Indiana

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Indiana, you can file a claim at the Indiana Department of Workforce Development’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Indiana law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Indiana, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have earned total base period wages that are one-and-a-half times greater than your highest quarter.
  • You must have earned at least $4,200 during the entire base period.
  • You must have earned at least $2,500 during the last six months of the base period

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Indiana residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive somewhere between $50 and $390 per week.

Iowa

Iowa

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Iowa, you can file a claim at the Iowa Workforce Development’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Iowa law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions). You may be able to collect benefits if you leave for medical reasons.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Iowa, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have earned wages in at least two quarters of the base period.
  • Your total base period wages must be at least one-and-a-quarter times higher than the wages of the highest base period quarter.
  • You must have earned wages of at least $1,660 in one quarter and at least $830 in a different quarter.

Iowa offers an alternative base period for some claimants.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Iowa residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You could receive somewhere between $62 and $511 per week. Those who have dependents will receive more than those who do not.

Kansas

Kansas

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Kansas, you can file a claim at the Kansas Department of Labor’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Kansas law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Kansas, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have received wages in at least two of the four quarters of the base period.
  • Your total base period wages must be at least one-and-a-quarter times higher than the wages of the highest base period quarter.
  • You must have at least 30 times your weekly benefit rate in the entire base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Kansas residents can collect unemployment benefits for between 16 and 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You could receive somewhere between $118 and $474 per week.

Kentucky

Kentucky

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Kentucky, you can file a claim at the Kentucky Career Center’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Kentucky law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions). You may also qualify if you meet certain compelling personal reasons, such as moving with your partner if he or she is relocated by the military.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Kentucky, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have received wages of at least $750 in at least one quarter.
  • Your total base period must be at least one-and-a-half times the wages in your highest quarter.
  • Your total wages outside of the highest quarter must be at least $750.
  • Your wages in the last two quarters must be at least eight times your weekly benefit rate.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Kentucky residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive somewhere between $39 and $415 per week.

Louisiana

Louisiana

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Louisiana, you can file a claim at the Louisiana Workforce Commission’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Louisiana law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Louisiana, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have made at least $1,200 during the base period.
  • You must have made a total of at least one-and-a-half times your earnings during the highest-paid quarter of your base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Louisiana residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive somewhere between $10 and $247 per week.

Maine

Maine

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Maine, you can file a claim at the Main Department of Labor’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Maine law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions). You may also qualify if you meet certain compelling personal reasons, such as moving with your partner if he or she is relocated by the military.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Maine, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have made at least two times the average weekly wage in Maine during at least two quarters of the base period.
  • You must have made at least six times the average weekly wage in Maine during the entire base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Maine residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive somewhere between $10 and $386 per week.

Maryland

Maryland

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Maryland, you can file a claim at the Maryland Department of Labor’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Maryland law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for misconduct related to your job. There are tiers of eligibility:
    • You wait 15 weeks to receive benefits after “simple“ misconduct.
    • You must get a new job and earn at least 25 times your weekly benefit amount to be eligible for unemployment after “gross“ misconduct.
    • You must get a new job and earn at least 30 times your weekly benefit amount to be eligible for unemployment after “aggravated“ misconduct.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions). You may also qualify if you meet certain compelling personal reasons, such as moving with your partner if he or she is relocated by the military.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Maryland, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have made at least $1,176 in your highest-paid quarter of the base period.
  • You must have earned at least one-and-a-half times your earnings in the highest-paid quarter, during the entire base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Maryland residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive somewhere between $50 and $430 per week.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Massachusetts, you can file a claim at the Massachusetts Department of Unemployment Assistance’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Massachusetts law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Massachusetts, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have earned at least $3,500 during the base period.
  • Your wages must have been at least 30 times the amount of your weekly unemployment benefits.

Massachusetts offers an alternative base period that takes into consideration your three most recent completed quarters, as well as the quarter in which you filed your claim.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Massachusetts residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 30 weeks, with additional weeks during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive a maximum of $698 per week as well as $25 per week for each dependent, up to one-half of your weekly benefit rate.

Michigan

Michigan

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Michigan, you can file a claim at the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Michigan law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), as well as significant mental health reasons.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Michigan, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following wage requirements:

  • You must have wages in at least two quarters in the base period.
  • You earned at least $2,871 in your highest quarter.
  • In the total base period, you must have been paid at least one-and-a-half times the amount of wages you earned.

Michigan offers an alternative base period that looks at your four most recent completed quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Michigan residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 20 weeks, with additional weeks during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive a maximum of $362 per week as well as $6 per week for each dependent, up to $30.

Minnesota

Minnesota

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Minnesota, you can file a claim at the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Minnesota law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Minnesota, in order to be eligible, you must have made at least $2,400 or 5.3 percent of the state’s average annual wage (rounded down to the next $100).

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Minnesota residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You may receive about 50 percent of your average weekly wage up to a maximum of $717.

Mississippi

Mississippi

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Mississippi, you can file a claim at the Mississippi Department of Employment Security’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Mississippi law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Mississippi, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following requirements:

  • Must have worked in at least two quarters of your base period.
  • Must have earned at least $780 in the highest quarter.
  • Must have earned 40 times your weekly benefit amount in your base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Mississippi residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive between $30 and $235 per week.

Missouri

Missouri

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Missouri, you can file a claim at Missouri’s official website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Missouri law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Missouri, in order to be eligible, you must meet one of the following requirements:

  • You must earn at least $2,250 during the base period and your total base period wages must be at least one-and-a-half times higher than the taxable wage base during at least two of your base period quarters.
  • You must earn at least one-and-a-half times more than the taxable wage base during at least two of the four base period quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Missouri residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 20 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive a maximum of $320 per week.

Montana

Montana

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Montana, you can file a claim at the Montana Department of Labor & Industry’s website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Montana law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job will make you ineligible for benefits unless you can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse).

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Montana, in order to be eligible, you must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Your base period wages must be one-and-a-half times your wages in the highest-paid quarter of the base period, and at least 7 percent of the state’s average annual wage
  • Your wages for the full base period must be at least 50 percent of the state’s average annual wage.

Montana also offers an alternative base period, which looks at your last four completed quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Montana residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 28 weeks, which is extended when there’s very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $151 and $510 per week.

Nebraska

Nebraska

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Nebraska, you can file a claim at the Nebraska Department of Labor website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Nebraska law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting your job without good cause will make you ineligible for benefits for 13 weeks. If you have good cause and can prove there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Nebraska, in order to be eligible, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You must have made $4,246.00 during the entire base period.
  • You must have earned at least $1,850 in one quarter and at least $800 in another.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Nebraska residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, or until one-third of the base period wages have been received.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to $426 per week.

Nevada

Nevada

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Nevada, you can file a claim at the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Nevada law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling work-related reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In Nevada, in order to be eligible, you must have earned at least $400 in the highest-paid quarter, as well as meet one of the following criteria:

  • Total earnings during the base period are one-and-a-half times your earnings during the highest-paid quarter.
  • You earned some wages in at least three of the four quarters of the base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Nevada residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $16 and $407 per week.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in New Hampshire, you can file a claim at the New Hampshire Employment Security website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Nevada law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In New Hampshire, to meet eligibility requirements, you must:

  • Have earned at least $2,800 during the full base period.
  • Have made at least $1,400 in two quarters of the base period.
  • You earned some wages in at least three of the four quarters of the base period.

New Hampshire also offers an alternative base period, which looks at your last four completed quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

New Hampshire residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with additional weeks during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $32 and $427 per week.

New Jersey

New Jersey

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in New Jersey, you can file a claim at the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by New Jersey law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing“ or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In New Jersey, to meet eligibility requirements, you must have worked for at least 20 weeks or earned at least $8,300 during the entire base period. New Jersey offers two alternative base periods.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

New Jersey residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive a maximum of $696 per week.

New Mexico

New Mexico

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in New Mexico, you can file a claim at the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by New Mexico law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. In New Mexico, to meet eligibility requirements, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must have earned at least $1,919.63 during the full base period.
  • You must have brought in wages during two quarters of the base period.

New Mexico offers an alternative base period that takes into considering your last four completed quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

New Mexico residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive between $82 and $442 per week.

New York

New York

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in New York, you can file a claim at the New York Department of Labor website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by New York law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in New York, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Earned wages in at least two quarters of the base period.
  • Wages must equal at least $2,400 in the highest-paid quarter of the base period.
  • Wages during the base period must equal at least one-and-a-half times the highest quarter.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

New York residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to a maximum of $420 per week.

North Carolina

North Carolina

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in North Carolina, you can file a claim at the North Carolina Division of Employment Security website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by North Carolina law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in North Carolina, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Earned wages in at least two quarters of the base period.
  • Made at least $780 in one of the last two quarters of the base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

North Carolina residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 20 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to $350 per week.

North Dakota

North Dakota

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in North Dakota, you can file a claim at the North Dakota Job Service website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by North Dakota law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in North Dakota, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Earned wages in at least two quarters of the base period.
  • Earned at least one-and-a-half times your wages in the highest-paid quarter of the base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

North Dakota residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive between $43 and $594 per week.

Ohio

Ohio

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Ohio, you can file a claim at the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Ohio law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Ohio, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must have worked a minimum of 20 weeks during the base period.
  • You must have earned an average of at least $237 per week.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Ohio residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive between $118 and $424 per week.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Oklahoma, you can file a claim at the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Oklahoma law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Oklahoma, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must have made at least one-and-a-half times your earnings in your highest-paid quarter.
  • You must have earned at least $1,500 throughout the base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Oklahoma residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive between $16 and $520 per week.

Oregon

Oregon

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Oregon, you can file a claim at the Oregon Employment Department website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Oregon law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Oregon, you must meet one of the following criteria:

  • You’ve been paid at least $1,000 in wages during your base year and your base year wages were at least one-and-a-half times the wages paid in the highest quarter of the base year.
  • You’ve worked at least 500 hours and were paid some wages in employment during the base year.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Oregon residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive between $126 and $538 per week.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Pennsylvania, you can file a claim at the Pennsylvania Office of Unemployed Compensation website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Pennsylvania law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Pennsylvania, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You’ve been paid at least $116 per week during at least 18 weeks in the base period.
  • You’ve been paid at least $1,688 during the highest quarter in your base period.
  • You’ve been paid at least $3,391 in total wages during the base period

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Pennsylvania residents can collect unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive 50 percent of your average weekly wages, up to the maximum of $573.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Rhode Island, you can file a claim at the Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Rhode Island law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Rhode Island, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You’ve been paid at least $4,040 during the base period.
  • You’ve been paid at least $2,020 during the highest quarter in your base period.
  • Combining the entire base period, you must have made at least one-and-a-half times what you earned in the highest-paid quarter.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Rhode Island residents can collect unemployment benefits for between 15 and 26 weeks, which varies based on the employment rate.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $51 and $566, as well as $15 for each dependent (up to five dependents).

South Carolina

South Carolina

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in South Carolina, you can file a claim at the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by South Carolina law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in South Carolina, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You earned at least $1,092 during the highest quarter of your base period.
  • You made at least $4,455 during the entire base period.
  • Your total wages during your base period must be one-and-a-half times what you earned in the highest-paid quarter.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and more. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

South Carolina residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 20 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $42 and $326.

South Dakota

South Dakota

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in South Dakota, you can file a claim at the South Dakota Department of Labor & Regulation website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by South Dakota law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in South Dakota, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You earned at least $728 during the highest quarter of your base period.
  • Your wages in the other three quarters of your base period must be at least 20 times your weekly benefit.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

South Dakota residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive a maximum of $352 per week.

Tennessee

Tennessee

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Tennessee, you can file a claim at the Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Tennessee law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-workforce will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Tennessee, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You earned at least $780.01 on average in your two highest-paid quarters of your base period.
  • You earned $900 or six times your weekly benefit amount in the three quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Tennessee residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $30 and $275 per week.

Texas

Texas

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Texas, you can file a claim at the Texas Workforce Commission website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Texas law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-workforce will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Texas, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You have earned wages in at least two of the quarters making up your base period.
  • Your base period earnings are at least 37 times your weekly benefit amount.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Texas residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to $465 per week.

Utah

Utah

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Utah, you can file a claim at the Utah Workforce Services website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Utah law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-workforce will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Utah, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You have earned $3,300 in wages during your base period.
  • Your total base period wages are at least one-and-a-half times higher than the wages in your highest quarter.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Utah residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to $496 per week.

Vermont

Vermont

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Vermont, you can file a claim at the Vermont Department of Labor website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Vermont law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Vermont, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You have earned at least $2,386 in the highest-paid quarter of your base period.
  • In the other three quarters combined, you made at least 40 percent of your highest-paid quarter earnings.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Utah residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to $436 per week.

Virginia

Virginia

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Virginia, you can file a claim at the Virginia Employment Commission website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Virginia law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Virginia, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You earned wages in at least two quarters of your base period.
  • You have earned at least $3,000 in two quarters of your base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Virginia residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $60 and $378 per week.

Washington

Washington

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Washington, you can file a claim at the Washington Employment Security Department website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Washington law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-workforce will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Washington, you must have worked 680 hours during the base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Washington residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $151 and $637 per week.

West Virginia

West Virginia

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in West Virginia, you can file a claim at the West Virginia Workforce website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by West Virginia law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in West Virginia, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must have earned wages in at least two quarters of your base period.
  • You must have earned at least $2,200 during your base period.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Washington residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $24 and $424.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Wisconsin, you can file a claim at the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Wisconsin law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

Wisconsin offers an alternative base period, which looks at the wages from the four most recently completed quarters.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Wisconsin, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must have been paid wages in two of the four quarters of your base period.
  • A certain amount of wages in your highest-paid quarter.
  • The combined wages in your three lowest quarters must equal at least four times your weekly benefits.
  • Your total base period wages must be equal to at least 35 times your weekly benefit.
  • If you were paid benefits in a prior benefit year, you must have worked since the beginning of that benefit year and earned at least eight times the weekly benefit rate you’re claiming.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Wisconsin residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $54 and $370.

Wyoming

Wyoming

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Wyoming, you can file a claim at the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Wyoming law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-force will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Wyoming, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must have earned at least eight percent of the state’s average annual wage (rounded down to the nearest $50).
  • Your entire base period wages must be at least 1.4 times your earnings from the highest-paid quarter in your base period.

Wyoming offers an alternative base period, which looks at the wages from the four most recently completed quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies depending on your skill set, training, salary and other factors. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.

Duration of Benefits

Wyoming residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks, with an extension during times of very high unemployment.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive somewhere between $34 and $475.

Washington D.C.

Washington D.C.

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Washington, D.C., you can file a claim at the District of Columbia Department of Employment Services website.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Washington, D.C., law. Here are the three primary ways you may lose your job and how each relates to your eligibility for benefits:

  • Layoffs due to “downsizing” or a reduction-in-workforce will qualify you for benefits.
  • Firing for reasons related to basic misconduct makes you ineligible for benefits during the first eight weeks following your termination. For gross misconduct, you won’t receive benefits until you’ve been re-employed for 10 weeks and earned at least 10 times the weekly benefit amount of your claim. However, if you’re fired simply because you weren’t a good fit or lacked the skills to perform the job, you may be able to collect.
  • Quitting would make you ineligible for benefits. If there was a compelling personal reason that forced you to leave (e.g., sexual harassment, dangerous working conditions, relocation with a military spouse), you will likely receive benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Washington, D.C., you must have made:

  • at least $1,300 in wages in one quarter of the base period;
  • wages in at least two quarters of the base period;
  • at least $1,950 in wages for the entire base period; and
  • total base period wages that are at least one and one half times the wages in your highest quarter.

Washington, D.C., offers an alternative base period, which looks at the wages from the four most recently completed quarters.

You must be able to work, available to work, and seeking employment. If you find a suitable position, you must accept it. Suitability varies based on your past training, education and experience. Over time, if you still haven’t found work, you may have to compromise on a job that doesn’t quite match what you were doing before.
You may be asked periodically to report your efforts to the American Job Center.

Duration of Benefits

Washington, D.C., residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive a maximum of $432 per week.

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in Puerto Rico, you can file a claim at Puerto Rico’s Department of Labor’s website.

Eligibility

  • You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by Puerto Rico law.
  • You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in Puerto Rico you must have worked at least two quarters of the base period.
  • You must be able to, available for and actively seeking work.

Duration of Benefits

Puerto Rico residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

Between $33 and $190 per week, and will increase to $60 and $240, respectively, on July 1, 2020.

Guam

Guam

The U.S. territory of Guam does not have an unemployment insurance program in place.

American Samoa

American Samoa

American Samoa does not have an unemployment insurance program. However, in the past, residents have been eligible for unemployment benefits following the declaration of a natural disaster. The program is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Association.

In 2018, for example, workers who temporarily lost their jobs due to Tropical Storm Gita were eligible for unemployment wages for up to 26 weeks, no more than $ 180 per week.

U.S. Virgin Islands

U.S. Virgin Islands

File a Claim

If you’ve lost your job in the U.S. Virgin Islands, you can file a claim at the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Labor’s website, over the phone or in person.

Eligibility

You must be unemployed through no fault of your own, as defined by U.S. Virgin Islands law. If you were fired or suspended from your previous job for misconduct, you won’t be eligible for benefits.

You must have made a certain amount of money before losing your job, which is calculated by your base period. Your base period is the earliest four of the five completed calendar quarters before you filed your benefits claim. For example, if your claim was filed on Oct. 10, 2019, your base period would be the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018, and ending June 30, 2019. To qualify for benefits in the U.S. Virgin Islands you must have made:

  • at least $858 in wages in one quarter of the base period and
  • total base period wages that are at least one and one half times the wages in your highest quarter.

You must be able to, available for and actively seeking work.

Duration of Benefits

U.S. Virgin Islands residents can collect unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks.

Weekly Benefit Rate

You can receive up to $552 per week.

North Mariana Islands

North Mariana Islands

The U.S. territory of the North Mariana Islands does not have an unemployment insurance program in place.

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