Jobs in Philadelphia, PA

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 4,895 Jobs Available
  • 1,560,297 Population
  • $60,000 Average Salary
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Philadelphia Jobs At A Glance

Philadelphia At A Glance

Philadelphia's a visual wonder, reminiscent of Colonial times with Georgian and Greek architecture meshed with modern structuring. Residents embrace its culture, arts, entertainment, shopping and professional landscape. Governing bodies heavily promote business growth through initiatives such as talent development and small business advocacy. Here's some key info about Philadelphia's current economic state, job market and what to do to improve chances of getting the best job.

Job Market in Philadelphia

Job Market in Philadelphia

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated weekly average salaries in Philly were $1,182, slightly higher than the national average ($1,048). Other good news is the city's unemployment rate dipped from 6.5% (August 2014) to 5.7% (August 2015). The national average was 5.2%. Top employment areas in the city are education and health services, professional and business services, government, trade, transportation and utilities, and leisure and hospitality. According to Pennsylvania Workforce Development, the city's largest occupations include database administrators, financial analysts, personal finance advisors, compliance officers, and claims adjusters, examiners and investigators. If you're resume-ready or willing to train, you could join these ranks.

Resume Tips For Philadelphia Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Philadelphia Jobseekers

Artists drop the mike and walk off to thunderous applause. That's the resume to aim for. Strong, informative, leaving hiring managers wanting to know more. Here are some tips for doing that.

  1. Section off your content accordingly. A strong work history should take up most of the page. Only students and graduates need school awards and GPA to impress. Your list of skills shouldn't look like a dictionary. Focus on your most attractive and relevant attributes instead of filling the page.
  2. Hiring managers understand that resumes are selling tools and embellishment is expected, but be careful. Instead of misinformation, focus on true value. This will only benefit you at the interview and, when you get the job, in the work culture.
  3. Use a consistent name on your resume. An important aspect of job searching is branding. Don't be @kenowens on Twitter, Kenny Owens on LinkedIn and Kenneth B. Owens at Google+. Use the same name across your online profile. It increases the possibility people will find what you want them to see.
  4. Use a professional email. They cost nothing, so create one for your job search. Call it kenowenstheworkr or kowensjobhunt. Skip monikers like topdog and me_da_man. You want contacts to see you're organized and serious.
  5. When writing about accomplishments, use a result-and-cause structure. Open with how the project turned out before briefly explaining the how: Increased sales 25% supervising a team of four analysts' in-depth study of vendor relationships.

How to Find Jobs in Philadelphia

How to Find Jobs in Philadelphia

They say make looking for a job your new job, but what does that even mean? How much time can you spend submitting resumes and waiting before half-losing your mind?Here are a few tips for planning that may help.

  1. Once a week create a list of companies that you're interested in. Whether they're hiring isn't relevant. Besides, even companies that claim to have no immediate openings has positions to fill. Use the list to fine tune your searches.
  2. Work platforms like LinkedIn and Google. Almost everyone of some business prominence has an Internet presence, meaning you can send correspondence to specific individuals as opposed to "Sir/Madam. " With a name in hand and, if you can't find it, call the company to get a business email.
  3. While you should always have one handy, never send or give your resume to someone who didn't ask for it. It's much less likely they will look at it. Instead, provide a little information about yourself, your accomplishments and what attracts you to their company. Offer to send your resume.
  4. After the initial contact, if you haven't heard anything, send a second email. (If you're following tip number one, you'll have a new list every week. ) Refer to your notes to briefly reiterate what you know about the company and why you'd make a great asset.
  5. Arrange informational interviews. You may have to cultivate a long distance relationship before getting busy professionals to sit with you, but it will be worth it. There's no greater way to learn about a company, an industry and to get your foot in the door.