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Orland township Jobs At A Glance

Orland township At A Glance

Orland Township is in Cook County, bordered by Harlem Avenue, 135th Street, Will-Cook Road and 183rd Street. It's a homey burg with a population of around 100,000. You can quickly get to like Arlington Heights, Chicago and Evanston. The region fosters economic growth through collaboration, development and nurturing a diverse workforce. It's about strategically leveraging resources, implementing effective programs and managing a system that ensures every resident has the potential to work, live and play. It's why Orland Township puts job growth front and center. If you're on the prowl for work, here's some preliminary information about the township's employment market and some of the best ways to navigate it.

Job Market in Orland Township

Job Market in Orland Township

Throughout the Chicago area, average weekly wages are $1,201. In Orland Township, salaries are $950 or more. The national average is $1,048. As for unemployment rates, Chicago and the United States have a rate of 4.9%. Orland Township and Cook County have a 5.2%.Key industries in the area are auto manufacturing (Ford, Omron), business services (Deloitte, Aon Hewitt), food (Kraft, Nestle), health care (Advocate, Presence Health) and technology (Motorola, Groupon). Major occupations include civil service, nursing, dentistry, sewage and water, and food prep (servers, cooks, fast food).

Resume Tips For Orland township Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Orland township Jobseekers

Despite high-tech advancements like LinkedIn, the resume is still the major reason you're going to get a job. The best networker isn't likely to get hired until after their resume has been reviewed. And that candidate will be in trouble if their resume has any of these blunders.

  1. Grammatical errors and typos. 'Nuff said.
  2. Incorrect information, whether or not intentional, makes you look, at best, lazy, at worse, untrustworthy. And it can hurt in ways you may never discover. One candidate didn't understand why they weren't getting interviews before realizing the phone number on their resume was wrong.
  3. Generic resumes automatically put you in a hiring manager's rejection pile. A study by CareerBuilder revealed 36% of resumes are rejected once the reader realized it was generic. Tailoring your resume to show you understand what an employer is looking for has to be a priority.
  4. While there are fields were creativity can be rewarded, a conventional format is the way to go. Professional fonts between 10 and 12 points, clean spacing around the page, consistent alignment and bullets, a header even if your resume goes only one extra page.
  5. Use direct and proactive language. Highlight accomplishments and successes, turning to regular tasks and duties if you have the space. Quantify everything with numbers and percentages. Dollar figures are fine, but take into account where you're applying. You raising $100,000 in the last quarter may not impress if their associates raised $100,000,000.

How to Find Jobs in Orland Township

How to Find Jobs in Orland Township

Unless things were absolutely intolerable, aim to leave a good impression with any employer. It looks good when you can explain you're still on good terms with an ex-employer or can actually get a reference from them. Whether you were laid off, fired or need to quit, here are a few things you can do to exit on good terms.

  1. Provide ample notice when quitting. Don't simply hand in your resignation. Set up a meeting and let your immediate supervisor know right after you do. You can now submit an official letter.
  2. Even if you've been fired, show appreciation for your time with the company. Send a letter to your bosses and Human Resources that expresses how you accept this is the way things are, you've learned a lot and appreciate the experience.
  3. Sit down with appropriate parties and talk about what needs to be done before your exit. Complete as many projects as possible and establish which ones will have to be reassigned. The goal is to show your sense of accountability and establish the idea that you care what happens after you leave.
  4. Agree to work with any replacement to get them up to speed. If things get complicated, offer to stick around as an hourly contractor. Put a limit on the time period, unless you want to have two jobs.
  5. Avoid gloating about your new prospect. Even if you only have a few days to go, focus as if you only have the one job. Everyone will be appreciative of your attitude.