Jobs in Oklahoma City, OK

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 1,674 Jobs Available
  • 620,602 Population
  • $50,000 Average Salary
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Oklahoma City Jobs At A Glance

Oklahoma City At A Glance

Oklahoma City has an impressive record. Fortune named it one of the 10 best cities to find a job, an accolade also bestowed by Glassdoor. WalletHub calls it a great place to start a small business, while Entrepreneur says it is the number one place to launch a business period. The region is also on lists for best cities for freelancers, best for business climate, best for highest annual earnings growth and a top spot for professional income gain.What's with all the hubbub? Let's find out.

Job Market in Oklahoma City

Job Market in Oklahoma City

The Bureau of Labor Statistics's latest economic summary for Oklahoma City is promising. Compared to the rest of the country's 5.2% unemployment rate, The Big Friendly has a 3.9%, the same as a year before. Its weekly average wages are below national (U.S.: $1,048; Oklahoma City: $928), but then the city has also been named one of the most affordable places to live.The Oklahoma Department of Commerce reports energy, oil and gas combined employs a quarter of the state's employees. Also strong are finance, transportation and agriculture. Aerospace and defense are fueled by Tinker Air Force Base, a major military and aviation logistics center, and the largest aircraft maintenance complex in the world, with over 26,000 employees.If you're interested in the region's in-demand jobs, investigate government, trade, transportation and utilities, education and health services, professional and business services, and hospitality.

Resume Tips For Oklahoma City Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Oklahoma City Jobseekers

Putting together a resume sounds like an easy enough task. Compile experiences, skill and education in a document that demonstrates why you should be granted an interview. The fact is a resume has to be carefully crafted to manage the most arbitrary reaction of the reader. Here are tips and advice that could help land the interview.

  1. It's been suggested job seekers get rid of the Professional Summary. Consider it essential if you're starting out and don't have a lot of experience, or you're looking at a new career. Otherwise, they say get to the meat-and-potatoes of the resume.
  2. A little design will be nice, but don't go overboard with icons, graphics, videos, infographics and the like. Tracking systems won't read them effectively and a traditional company won't be impressed.
  3. If your experience isn't what it should be, focus on relevant and transferable skills. Use related projects and activities that demonstrate your understanding of what the job entails.
  4. While it is highly advised you tailor every submission to the job in specific, stick with information fed by the job description. Tons of industry phrases and abbreviations may be lost on the person that sees your resume. Be industry smart, but keep it layman readable.
  5. Review each bullet point and imagine how you can reword it so that it reads like you don't do stuff but get things done. Communicate the benefits an employer receives by hiring you!

How to Find Jobs in Oklahoma City

How to Find Jobs in Oklahoma City

Plan your job search so that it's organized, focused and minimizes stress. Here are a few tips for doing just that.

  1. What type of job do you think suits your desire and skill? Do you like working in groups? Are you a traveler, someone that likes working with their hands or enjoys public speaking? Your personality is key to finding the right job.
  2. Know how to network. While finding a job is about selling yourself, talking about yourself all the time can turn people off. Be an active listener. Talk about the industry and experiences the other person can share that may help.
  3. Whatever the venue (resume, interview, job fair) keep in mind what have you accomplished that makes you stand out. Use the answers as talking points when convincing someone of your candidacy's viability.
  4. If you're working, make sure recruiters and hiring managers understand the need for discretion. Don't necessarily blurt it out, but casually mention you'd prefer they not contact your current employer, especially if they ask.
  5. Phone interviews are great. You can keep paper and pen handy, have a list of talking points to one side and do them in your underwear. But be as prepped and professional as you would during a face-to-face. Sit at a table or desk, go where noise in the house won't interrupt and strive to be engaging.