Jobs in Newark, NJ

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 67,595 Jobs Available
  • 280,579 Population
  • $78,000 Average Salary
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Newark Jobs At A Glance

Newark At A Glance

You might hear a joke or two about living in Newark, but there is no greater metropolis. Newark is about pride, productivity and success. The city initiates programs, training and education to improve its market and give everyone a chance to grow professionally. If you're looking for work in Newark, take a look at this valuable information about the city's job market.

Job Market in Newark

Job Market in Newark

In April 2015, the city had an unemployment rate closing in on 10%, almost twice the national average of 5.2%. Newark has successfully managed to recover almost three-quarters of jobs lost during the recession. Top performing industries are manufacturing, health services, retail, entertainment and transportation. Prominent occupations are medical and health services managers, engineering managers, claims adjusters, examiners and investigators, management analysts and computer network support specialists.The average weekly salary in the Newark area is promising. In the vicinity of $1,500, it's well above the national average of $1,048.

Resume Tips For Newark Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Newark Jobseekers

Looking for work has its challenges for all different types of groups. Here are a few tips for creating resumes aimed at groups that require specific needs.

  1. Job hoppers have to deal with the appearance of being erratic and too independent to be team players. Counter this by highlighting skills and talent as opposed to background. With a functional resume, employment isn't stressed so much as what you've learned and accomplished. You can detail projects, achievements and skills.
  2. When you're over 40 and looking for work, you have a whole new set of challenges. Avoid listing anything beyond a 10 year period. Shine a spotlight on recent relevant accomplishments. Career counselors suggest leaving dates off the education sector.
  3. Stay-at-home parents go back into the market all the time. Unfortunately, hiring managers aren't drawn to candidates that may not see employment as a priority. Fill your resume with information about volunteer work, freelance projects and continued education. Paint a picture of professional development maintained while you were out of work.
  4. Students and graduates may find it difficult to fill a resume when their professional experiences are limited. Remember the importance of transferable skills. What have you done that shows hiring managers you're a productive asset? Volunteer work, fixing things, typing, carpentry, school clubs and more all show you're smart, organized and ready to work.
  5. The idea of changing careers can be personally rewarding, but imagine the reservations hiring managers might have. They lean towards candidates with industry experience and acumen. Rework your resume to emphasize key objectives for the new field. Fill it with projects, leadership and inspiration that demonstrate highly sought after transferable skills.

How to Find Jobs in Newark

How to Find Jobs in Newark

In tough economies, do more than just keep an eye on job posts. Be savvy, aggressive and thorough. The future's in your hands and, with this handful of tips, so is the progression of your job hunt.

  1. Anyone utilizing only job postings and resume submissions is doing themselves an injustice. Referrals are the number one reason people get hired. Cold calls and agencies may reveal opportunities you'd never see anywhere else. Diversify the ways you look for work.
  2. Make networking your primary resource. It should take up to 60% of the search. Attending job fairs, making cold calls, conducting research, leveraging social media, all should be in your toolkit.
  3. Career counselors believe you shouldn't concern yourself so much with money than finding the right fit. Most of us are giddy about great pay, but we need to remember a large portion of our lives will be devoted to that environment.
  4. During interviews, stay away from general statements. Validate them, especially the dreaded questions about weaknesses and strengths, with examples where you successfully navigated obstacles. Never imply you have no weakness, or use a weakness that's really a strength ("I work too hard. "). No one believes you.
  5. As the interview winds down, a good gauge to see how things went is to ask about the next step. If the answer is vague or too general, it's likely you're not getting the second call. You may be able to save the situation by asking if there are any concerns and providing reassuring responses.