Jobs in Hayward, CA

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 7,036 Jobs Available
  • 154,612 Population
  • $80,000 Average Salary
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Hayward Jobs At A Glance

Hayward At A Glance

Spend an afternoon getting a bird's-eye view of the city from a private jet. Sit under some trees in The Bistro's beer garden. Get there on Mondays and take in aspiring talent on open mike night. Check out the Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center or the Douglas Morrison Theatre to see the city's cultural diversity. Explore Garin Regional Park or the Hayward Japanese Gardens.Bordered by Union City and Castro Valley, the city of Hayward is located in the East Bay of San Francisco in Alameda County. From new employment credits for small business to training and counseling for the job seeker, Hayward seeks to serve and grow its community. Hayward has a variety of opportunities for a range of talents. Recent postings included jobs for DJs, account managers, senior sales associates and wedding planners. Whether you're starting your job search or have been on the prowl a while, the following introduction to the city's job market, job prospects and average salaries should be useful.

Job Market in Hayward, CA

Job Market in Hayward, CA

In April of 2015, Hayward had an unemployment rate of 6.3%, significantly higher than the U.S. national average of 5.4%. By September, it had dropped to 5.9% while the national average was 4.9%. Major industries include the school district and education, government, health care, transportation, pharmaceuticals and engineering. Among the city's biggest employers are St. Rose Hospital, Gillig and Impax Laboratories. The largest occupations are civil service, education, health services, professional and business services, and trade, transportation and utilities.Average weekly salaries for the Alameda area are between $1,300–$1,399, higher than the national average ($1,048).

Resume Tips For Hayward Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Hayward Jobseekers

What's wrong with my resume?It should be a question you ask any time you send it out. Review it every time. Use the following tips to make sure it shines.

  1. TheLadders suggests reading a resume out loud, only before each statement, say "You should give me a bonus because I . . . " If the statement doesn't make sense with the addition, it's a credential you probably don't need.
  2. Quantifiers rule. A resume should glow with dollar signs, fractions and percentages. Hiring managers are a lot more impressed with quantifiable achievements compared to dry qualitative descriptions.
  3. Too many of us are applying for jobs we're not qualified for. Worse, we submit a resume that clearly shows this. Write a resume that shows you have the skills, experience and education for that job. If you can't, don't send your resume.
  4. A list of everything you're ever done is a big no-no. No more than five to 10 bullets on the most recent work, basing that on length of time you were there. Going back, no more than three to five.
  5. Read sample resumes for your position and industry. Find them on the Internet and print them out. Reading on screen and reading hard copies are different experiences.

How to Find Jobs in Hayward, CA

How to Find Jobs in Hayward, CA

Be prepared for the job interview. There are some things that should be waiting in your portfolio. Here are five of them.

  1. Directions and Instructions. Unless you're absolutely sure you know where you're going, have a map and GPS. You never know which one you may have to rely on. If the hiring manager told you what to bring, have that list written out as well.
  2. Identification. You may need it to get in the building or someone may ask for it to make a copy for company records. We're not talking about your college or job ID. Have a valid driver's license or state ID.
  3. Pen and Notepad. You're going to want to quickly jot down names and information. You can substitute your mobile device if it's not too distracting. (Opening a laptop falls in that category. )
  4. Resume and References. Always bring neat and nicely printed copies of your resume, as well as your references and letters of recommendation. Attach everything to any applications you're asked to fill out, but do not hand them to any interviewer unless they request them.
  5. Have your list of questions and information you've learned about the company. You can skim it as the conversation progresses. If the opportunity comes up to naturally ask questions, do so. Save the rest for the end of the interview. Avoid looking like you're scripting the whole thing.