Jobs in Elizabeth, NJ

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 70,854 Jobs Available
  • 128,705 Population
  • $78,000 Average Salary
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Elizabeth Jobs At A Glance

Elizabeth At A Glance

In its mission to become a partner in "one-stop" shopping business development, Elizabeth has transformed into a hub for shipping, transportation and retail. The city has an award-winning program that offers new business and developers significant tax breaks, securing tens of millions of dollars to invigorate business and improve quality of life.Finding work is never easy, but Elizabeth is doing everything in its power to give everyone the best opportunities. Here is some information about the city's job market.

Job Market in Elizabeth

Job Market in Elizabeth

Elizabeth continues to fight the good fight against unemployment. It opened the year with a rate of 8.7%. By September 2015, that number had dropped to 7.0% compared to the national average of 4.9%. Average weekly salaries are roughly $1,200. The average for the entire country is about $1,000.Transportation is the city's biggest sector. Two of the world's busiest ports are located here, Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal and the Newark Liberty International Airport. Elizabeth's strategic location makes it a center for sea, air, road and rail networks. Manufacturing is important to the city's economy. The city is also a leader in telecommunications, retail and trade, life insurance, and chemicals and machinery.If you have a technical skill related to manufacturing or construction, you're ready to find work in two of the city's biggest occupations. Other major job markets include civil servants, nursing, and trade, transportation and utilities.

Resume Tips For Elizabeth Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Elizabeth Jobseekers

The smart executive knows one thing: what they have to offer. They provide a level of service that benefits employer, employees, clients, customers, stockholders, boards and more. The resume has to reflect this or you're already two steps behind.

  1. Executives see that goals are met. Your resume has to show how your ability to do that adds value. Sell yourself, convincing hiring managers that you can do what they want.
  2. A resume should be focused. You're either experienced in investment banking or accounting. Have a different resume for each, but don't try to demonstrate your expertise in both unless that's what the job description asks for. While employers love multi-taskers, they're looking to fill specific positions with specific talents.
  3. The bottom line for any executive is saving or making money. Your resume should be a history that highlights your ability to make a difference. Whether you improved productivity or increased revenue, use numbers. Percentages are better than dollars. If the information's confidential, use words like approximately and round numbers up.
  4. Wherever possible, put achievements into context. You didn't merely increase sales, it was the company's highest increase in three years. This gives the reader a sense of your impact.
  5. When hiring managers conduct that initial skim, reinforce what you want them to see. Create a clean design where key information is easy to find. Use colors, bold and shading to draw the eye.

How to Find Jobs in Elizabeth

How to Find Jobs in Elizabeth

If you've been an executive for over a decade, finding yourself on the market can be jarring. Even if you're Internet-smart, things are drastically different. Here are five tips to reposition yourself for the best prospects.

  1. It's easy to get lost in job search activities unless you determine what your goals are. Are you planning to stay the course and find a similar position or pursue your dream job? Do a little research and use your findings to make an informed decision.
  2. You minimize your potential unless you identify your personal brand and value. Everything from your resume to your interview style and online persona has to articulate why you're the right candidate.
  3. Create a resume that focuses on generating a "wow" reaction. Use the STAR formula. By clearly outlining situation-task-action-results, you highlight your ability to lead, initiate, solve problems and protect an employer's interests.
  4. You're going to need a portfolio that includes a career biography, networking information, accomplishment summaries and sample documents. They'll make for powerful resources as you navigate the job market, especially as hand-outs wherever your travels take you.
  5. Typical commercial sources have thousands of generic jobs. You could waste a lot of time trying to find a fit. The focus has to be on executives, CEOs and MBAs. You want resources designed for management positions. Visit sites and confer with headhunters that specialize in your goals.