BROWSE CVs

Executive CV Template and Writing Guidelines

Now more than ever, having a quality application package is crucial when looking for a new position. Our executive CV template and accompanying guidelines show you what employers are looking for during the hiring process. We have also included a sample CV, so you can visualize what a completed document would look like. A strong CV shows a potential employer your professionalism, qualifications and attention to detail. When written poorly, the CV can have a detrimental effect on your application materials, but when done right, it boosts your chances of getting called in for an interview.

Executive CV Template

Sections to Include in Your Executive CV Template

A CV allows for many sections to give the employer a thorough look at you as a job candidate. Our executive CV template features a variety of sections, including Hobbies and Interests, Work Experience, Education and a Professional Summary.

Contact and Personal Information

When filling out the executive CV template, be sure to input all important contact information. In addition to your email address and phone number, you can include a professional website or portfolio. Make sure all this information is written correctly so the hiring manager can reach you. If you don't know much about the company and are reluctant to give too many personal details, you may wish to leave off your street address, as your city and state provide enough physical information. Unlike with a resume, you can also include information about your marital status, nationality, gender and age. Be as thorough as you wish to put your best foot forward for the job.

Professional Summary

Your professional summary is a "teaser" to the rest of the CV, and it encourages the employer to keep reading. Professional summaries have become more popular than objective statements, as they allow you to inform the reader why you're the best candidate for the position. In this section, list your years of experience, any specialty areas, and some personality traits that are important for the job. This section can either be written in full sentences or phrases. Make each word count by using concrete information and action verbs to get your point across. Our executive CV template makes it easy to start your document off with a thorough professional summary.

Below are two examples of professional summaries that you can use as reference points when writing your own:

Example for a Police Support Specialist

I have 10 years of experience working in the records unit of the city police department. I expertly field calls from the public, both over the phone and in person. I disseminate confidential records for the community and release them in a timely manner. I often have to make swift judgment calls when troubleshooting sensitive matters. My employers know they can count on me to be meticulous, trustworthy and professional.

Example for a Wedding Photographer

I have been photographing weddings for over five years for private clients. I rely mostly on word of mouth, and because of my reputation, I often have a full schedule. I photograph in many different types of locations and for a variety of wedding styles, including beach weddings, traditional church weddings and even themed ceremonies. My work has been featured in a number of bridal magazines, and my background in photography at Columbia University has led to this satisfying career.

Your professional summary is a "teaser" to the rest of the CV, and it encourages the employer to keep reading. Professional summaries have become more popular than objective statements, as they allow you to inform the reader why you're the best candidate for the position. In this section, list your years of experience, any specialty areas, and some personality traits that are important for the job. This section can either be written in full sentences or phrases. Make each word count by using concrete information and action verbs to get your point across. Our executive CV template makes it easy to start your document off with a thorough professional summary.

Below are two examples of professional summaries that you can use as reference points when writing your own:

Example for a Police Support Specialist

I have 10 years of experience working in the records unit of the city police department. I expertly field calls from the public, both over the phone and in person. I disseminate confidential records for the community and release them in a timely manner. I often have to make swift judgment calls when troubleshooting sensitive matters. My employers know they can count on me to be meticulous, trustworthy and professional.

Example for a Wedding Photographer

I have been photographing weddings for over five years for private clients. I rely mostly on word of mouth, and because of my reputation, I often have a full schedule. I photograph in many different types of locations and for a variety of wedding styles, including beach weddings, traditional church weddings and even themed ceremonies. My work has been featured in a number of bridal magazines, and my background in photography at Columbia University has led to this satisfying career.

Writing Your Experience Section

Fill in your work experience section using the executive CV template to show employers why they should hire you. Here you can list detailed information about your past experience and how that qualifies you for the job. Even if your previous positions aren't directly related to the one you are applying for, consistent employment shows responsibility and a strong work ethic.

  • Begin with your most recent job and work your way backward. Leave off any job you held over 10 years ago.
  • Include the name of the employer, the location and the dates of employment.
  • Use bullet points to discuss your job duties, beginning with the most important. The bullets make it easier for the reader to glean all of the information.

    Below are some examples of strong work experience sections (note: you will want to include at least 6 to 8 bullets per position held):

    HVAC Specialist, Good Vibrations, Seattle, WA, 2007-2010
  • Installed and repaired furnaces, air conditioners and other HVAC units for commercial and residential clients.
  • Troubleshot issues and advised clients on purchases and repairs.

    Ballet Teacher, First Pointe, Portland, OR, 2006-Present
  • Teach girls and boys ages 7 to 18 at private dance academy.
  • Mentor students who go on to enroll in professional programs for careers in dance.

    Bassist, High Note, Sacramento, CA, 2009-2013
  • Performed in jazz band at high-end nightclub three nights a week.
  • Participated in free concerts to raise money for local charities in the neighborhood.

    Pet Sitter, Cat Fancy, Phoenix, AZ, 2008-2010
  • Cared for animals in residents' homes, including feeding, grooming and encouraging playtime.
  • Worked for upscale clientele in gated communities, with their complete trust to enter their homes while away.
  • Education and Training

    Along with your work history, your education and training shows off concrete experiences that make you a qualified candidate. The executive CV template makes inputting this information easy. Many applicants don't apply for positions that directly correspond to their degree specialization, but possessing a degree in and of itself can help you land a position. These guidelines can help you write this section in a professional manner:

    • Unless it is your highest level of education, don't list your high school diploma, as it is implied.
    • Don't include your GPA unless you're a recent graduate; however, you can list academic distinctions such as summa cum laude and magna cum laude.
    • Note other training as well, including certifications, coursework without a degree and professional training.
    Below are some examples to refer to when writing your education and training section:

    Master of Arts in Sociology, Oxnard College. Graduated cum laude.

    Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy, Sydney Institute

    Writing Your Skills Section

    Writing down your skills is important to show off your unique qualifications that other applicants might not possess. Enter this information into the executive CV template while keeping the employer in mind. For instance, you will want to tailor this section to the skills the hiring manager is most likely looking for.

    • Use relevant keywords to catch the employer's attention.
    • List any formal or measureable skills you may have, including language and computer proficiency.
    • Begin with the most important skills first, as this will put your best foot forward.
    Here are some examples of what someone might include in a skills section for a Professor:

    Frequent public speaking in a lecture hall of up to 300 students.
    Proficient with the online instruction platform Blackboard Learn.
    Passionate about making subject matter engaging and fun.

    Writing Your Scholarship and Awards Section

    Scholarships and awards often put an applicant above others, as they demonstrate a commitment to excellence. These types of qualifications show your exceptionality and that others have given you professional recognition. When filling in your scholarships and awards in the executive CV template, be sure to include anything relevant, even if it may seem small. Things like "Employee of the Month," grants and fellowships are all worthy of being placed in your CV. Provide some background about each recognition, so the employer has some additional information about what it entails. You may also want to include things like the number of applicants or the name of the organization to show the competitiveness of the accolade. Write your information in a list format for easy readability, which allows the employer to scan it quickly.

    Below are some examples of what to include in a scholarship and awards section:

    2015: Teacher of the Year at Bayside Academy for exceptional service. Nominated by student body and won 93 percent of the votes.

    2012: New Publisher Award from Publishers International for largest increase in subscriptions over a three-month period.

    Writing Your Hobbies and Interests Section

    We include a hobbies and interests section in our executive CV template, even though this section isn't required. Filling it out can be especially useful if you don't have much prior work experience, if you are transitioning to a new field, or if you are looking for a promotion. A myriad of details may be appropriate to mention here, including sports, classes outside of school and how you like to spend your weekends. The following tips can help you fill out this section with confidence:

  • Pay most attention to hobbies and interests that align with the position you are applying for.
  • Mention any leadership roles, as they demonstrate personality strengths that an employer can then mentally transfer to how you would perform on the job.
  • Include sports you play yourself or those you assist others in playing. The sports don't have to be professional in nature.
Here is an example of a hobbies and interests section that you can use for guidance:

Enjoy playing golf on weekends and volunteer at low-income golf events for teens in the community. Dabble in landscape photography and sell pictures on Etsy.com. Assistant coach for middle school Little League team.

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