Jobs in Centennial, CO

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 3,468 Jobs Available
  • 107,201 Population
  • $55,000 Average Salary
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Centennial Jobs At A Glance

Centennial At A Glance

Centennial is populated by loyalists, people who love what's around them. From hills, ravines and gorgeous open spaces to top companies like Comcast and US Foods, residents appreciate and want to preserve what the city has to offer. It's why the city's dedicated to managing a vibrant economic infrastructure. In order to retain existing business and draw in new business, Centennial offers incentives to commercial property owners and business partners, while providing a range of assistance to anyone that wants to work.If you’re looking for a job, you’ll want to know a little about the job market, job prospects and average salaries. What follows is a preliminary introduction to all of the above.

Job Market in Centennial

Job Market in Centennial

As of September 2015, the city had a respectable 3.2% unemployment rate, lower than the country's 4.9%. The region's average weekly wages were $1,000 while the nation's was $1,048.The biggest industry is trade, transportation and utilities. This is a primarily blue collar sector that covers everything from drivers to retail trade. Professional and business services is a strong economic factor, a supersector that includes professional, scientific and technical services, company and enterprise management, and administrative and support and waste management and remediation services. Other strong contributors are education, health services and government. The biggest employers can be found in food services, administrative support, transportation, nursing and civil service.

Resume Tips For Centennial Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Centennial Jobseekers

You spend day after day submitting resumes. We assume that it's merely read by a hiring manager who decides whether to schedule an interview. But there's a little more to the process than that.

  1. Technology has put a new face on resume review. A lot of companies use tracking systems to "read" documents for specific keywords and phrases. It's why you have to tailor your resume with the right jargon and descriptives that come right out of the job posting.
  2. If your resume gets through the technological stage, your resume may reach the desk of a reader before it gets to a hiring manager. The reader reviews each to ensure it has all the criteria the employer's looking for.
  3. The next step will be the hiring manager. These individuals are more likely to skim a resume. If you've crafted a clean, well-formatted document, the pertinent information will stand out and prompt a second, closer read.
  4. Expect direct contact if you make it past that last point. You'll get a call where someone asks a few questions and suggests an interview. Be friendly and positive. Once the interview is set, send a quick email to confirm day and time.
  5. Before or after scheduling the interview, the hiring manager may decide to do some investigation. Keep in mind what they could find out about you, especially from the Internet. Be prepared to deal with it.

How to Find Jobs in Centennial

How to Find Jobs in Centennial

Getting started or going in another career direction is a challenge. The conflict is if jobs require experience, how do you justify your worth when you lack the background companies are looking for? But with a little forethought, perseverance and confidence, you can work around what could be a handicap.

  1. If you're starting out, hiring managers will not expect extensive experience. But then, you should be looking at internships and entry level positions. You need to launch a campaign that illuminates your motivation, curiosity and commitment, as well as academic success and leadership.
  2. If changing industries or careers, you need to highlight achievements, successes, projects and skills. You have to demonstrate how you lack experience on one hand, but on the other you've accumulated the transferable skills and leadership that an employer needs, and that you're willing to learn and work hard.
  3. Compile a list of your skills and compare them to job postings of interest. See if you have the technical, communication, computer, research and problem-solving skills that a company's looking for. Use the alignments to craft your cover letters, resume and online profiles.
  4. Remember to showcase soft skills. These are the ability to work with others, professionalism, responsiveness, critical thinking and follow-through. These are skills every employer's looking for.
  5. Get some hands-on experience by volunteering. You'll learn, connect and provide a service that you can use to impress hiring managers. Being productive and proactive are invaluable assets.