What Should Salary Expectation Be After Degrees?

Louis writes:
I am 31 years old and have just completed an associate’s degree in computer
networking and then went on to complete a B.S. degree in computer science.
I am now studying for a B.S. in business administration. Then I will be
continuing on for my MBA. I am currently working as a computer analyst
making only $30000 a year. What types of salaries should I expect
after completing all four of these degrees? I intend on being a project
manager. Am I wasting my time and money on education? Or will I be
able to command salaries of over $60K to $70K because of the
education that I intend to complete. What is a good career progression?
And how should I go about progressing to that upper salaried positions.



The Career Doctor responds:
I think far too many job-seekers put too much emphasis on salary when
researching careers or conducting career planning. Yes what we earn is
important to our feelings of self-worth and self-esteem but let’s not
overlook the importance of the intrinsic value of enjoying what you do.
So if project management really excites you — and you can make a
good living doing it — then that’s a good match for you. Please do be
careful of picking careers or jobs simply based on how much you’ll
be able to make. And in this job market many job-seekers would
love a job where they are making only $30000 a year.
I do want to congratulate you on the ability to balance working and
attending classes at the same time because not everyone can do
that and while it will take you longer to reach your educational and
career goals you’ll be a more experienced and well-rounded job-seeker.
How can you best determine if project management is a good match for
you — both in terms of your interests skills and education — as well
as your salary requirements? Hit the online job boards and examine
as many project management positions as you can find. Not only will
this research help with your career goals but you’ll be able to compile
a list of keywords and phrases that employers use when seeking project
managers. Once you have those keywords you should be sure that you
use them in your resumes and cover letters.
You should also consider conducting a few informational interviews
with people who are currently involved in project management. Not
only will these interviews help build your network you’ll also learn a
great deal about the skills experience and education valued in that
profession.
Go to this section of Quintessential Careers to find job sites where
you can conduct research: Best
Job Sites for Job-Seekers
.
Learn more about informational interviewing by using the
Informational
Interviewing Tutorial
found at Quintessential Careers.

;

Louis writes:
I am 31 years old and have just completed an associate’s degree in computer
networking and then went on to complete a B.S. degree in computer science.
I am now studying for a B.S. in business administration. Then I will be
continuing on for my MBA. I am currently working as a computer analyst
making only $30000 a year. What types of salaries should I expect
after completing all four of these degrees? I intend on being a project
manager. Am I wasting my time and money on education? Or will I be
able to command salaries of over $60K to $70K because of the
education that I intend to complete. What is a good career progression?
And how should I go about progressing to that upper salaried positions.



The Career Doctor responds:
I think far too many job-seekers put too much emphasis on salary when
researching careers or conducting career planning. Yes what we earn is
important to our feelings of self-worth and self-esteem but let’s not
overlook the importance of the intrinsic value of enjoying what you do.
So if project management really excites you — and you can make a
good living doing it — then that’s a good match for you. Please do be
careful of picking careers or jobs simply based on how much you’ll
be able to make. And in this job market many job-seekers would
love a job where they are making only $30000 a year.
I do want to congratulate you on the ability to balance working and
attending classes at the same time because not everyone can do
that and while it will take you longer to reach your educational and
career goals you’ll be a more experienced and well-rounded job-seeker.
How can you best determine if project management is a good match for
you — both in terms of your interests skills and education — as well
as your salary requirements? Hit the online job boards and examine
as many project management positions as you can find. Not only will
this research help with your career goals but you’ll be able to compile
a list of keywords and phrases that employers use when seeking project
managers. Once you have those keywords you should be sure that you
use them in your resumes and cover letters.
You should also consider conducting a few informational interviews
with people who are currently involved in project management. Not
only will these interviews help build your network you’ll also learn a
great deal about the skills experience and education valued in that
profession.
Go to this section of Quintessential Careers to find job sites where
you can conduct research: Best
Job Sites for Job-Seekers
.
Learn more about informational interviewing by using the
Informational
Interviewing Tutorial
found at Quintessential Careers.

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