What Medical Specialty to Choose?

Haylee writes:
I’m a senior in high school. I’m planning to study medicine but my problem is that
I’m not sure which rank of medicine I would like to study. I was wondering if you
could be kind enough to email me the different types of doctor careers there
are and what they do.


The Career Doctor responds:
I think a medical career is a wonderful calling — even with all the crises in
healthcare in this country right now — medicine is such an important career
for those who have a desire to help people. Just remember that you are still
young and have not experienced much of what college offers so while you
may remain true to your choice and become a doctor you may also veer into
any number of other career paths — so just keep your eyes open to all the
possibilities that await you.
OK. So careers in medicine; specifically career paths for doctors.
You can choose to be a generalist or a specialist.
According to the Association of American Medical Colleges “About
one-third of the nation’s physicians are generalists — ‘primary care’ doctors
who provide lifelong medical services for you and all the members of your
family. General internists family physicians and general pediatricians
are all considered generalist doctors. They are the first doctors you
consult for medical care.”
(Read more.)
The other two-thirds of doctors specialize in a wide variety of areas that basically
fall into one of these categories: research obstetrics and gynecology cardiology psychiatry or surgery. Within these categories are specialists in: dermatology gastroenterology cardiovascular diseases pulmonary diseases general surgery orthopedic surgery and many more too numerous to mention. Read more in this
section of the Department of Labor’s
Occupational Outlook Handbook.
I suggest you begin talking with doctors now — even before you start college.
Use your network to find a variety of doctors — and then conduct some informational interviews to learn more about their careers (and how you can best prepare for yours).
Learn more about informational interviews by reading this article
published on Quintessential Careers:
Informational
Interviewing: A Powerful Tool for College Students
.
Start reviewing medical job and career information in this section of Quintessential Careers:
Jobs in Health Care
Medicine Pharmaceuticals and Social Work
.

;

Haylee writes:
I’m a senior in high school. I’m planning to study medicine but my problem is that
I’m not sure which rank of medicine I would like to study. I was wondering if you
could be kind enough to email me the different types of doctor careers there
are and what they do.


The Career Doctor responds:
I think a medical career is a wonderful calling — even with all the crises in
healthcare in this country right now — medicine is such an important career
for those who have a desire to help people. Just remember that you are still
young and have not experienced much of what college offers so while you
may remain true to your choice and become a doctor you may also veer into
any number of other career paths — so just keep your eyes open to all the
possibilities that await you.
OK. So careers in medicine; specifically career paths for doctors.
You can choose to be a generalist or a specialist.
According to the Association of American Medical Colleges “About
one-third of the nation’s physicians are generalists — ‘primary care’ doctors
who provide lifelong medical services for you and all the members of your
family. General internists family physicians and general pediatricians
are all considered generalist doctors. They are the first doctors you
consult for medical care.”
(Read more.)
The other two-thirds of doctors specialize in a wide variety of areas that basically
fall into one of these categories: research obstetrics and gynecology cardiology psychiatry or surgery. Within these categories are specialists in: dermatology gastroenterology cardiovascular diseases pulmonary diseases general surgery orthopedic surgery and many more too numerous to mention. Read more in this
section of the Department of Labor’s
Occupational Outlook Handbook.
I suggest you begin talking with doctors now — even before you start college.
Use your network to find a variety of doctors — and then conduct some informational interviews to learn more about their careers (and how you can best prepare for yours).
Learn more about informational interviews by reading this article
published on Quintessential Careers:
Informational
Interviewing: A Powerful Tool for College Students
.
Start reviewing medical job and career information in this section of Quintessential Careers:
Jobs in Health Care
Medicine Pharmaceuticals and Social Work
.

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