What Can You Do with a Math Degree?


Tiffany writes:
Hi! I am currently working on a degree in math. I love math but I do not want to teach it. I
have been trying to figure out other possible careers. I have thought about engineering but
I do not know what kind to choose. I like to solve problems and work with equations. My father
is an applications engineer. I know that I do not want to do what he does. I basically just love
math and was wondering what some possible career choices I have.



The Career Doctor responds:
Besides teaching the ideas for careers that use math and/or the critical skills of math that
immediately come to mind are mathematician engineer statistician economist cryptographer accountant market researcher business analyst actuary and computer technician/programmer.
As you’ve probably already discovered people who are good at math have a number of very
useful (and transferable) skills that can be used in a variety of careers. Some of these skills
include: number-crunching problem-solving critical-thinking and observation interpreting and analyzing situations and information logical/rational thinking and organizational skills.
The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
Report on Mathematics in Industry found that the
most important traits of nonacademic mathematicians in finding jobs are:

  • Problem-solving — skills in formulating modeling and solving problems from diverse and changing areas.
  • Flexibility — interest in knowledge of and flexibility across applications.
  • Computation — knowledge of and experience with computation.
  • Communication — communication skills spoken and written.
  • Teamwork — adeptness at working with colleagues in group situations.

Take the time to research various occupations and careers that use math skills. Talk to
your math professors. Go to the career center at your college and meet with a counselor.
Go to the library (or online) and use resources such as the U.S. Department of Labor’s
Occupational
Outlook Handbook
.
One final resource that I thought would be especially interesting to you is the
Association for Women in Mathematics.
You’ll find lots of great resources for women who are considering careers in math.
Find more career exploration resources in this section of Quintessential Careers:
Career Exploration Resources.

;

Tiffany writes:
Hi! I am currently working on a degree in math. I love math but I do not want to teach it. I
have been trying to figure out other possible careers. I have thought about engineering but
I do not know what kind to choose. I like to solve problems and work with equations. My father
is an applications engineer. I know that I do not want to do what he does. I basically just love
math and was wondering what some possible career choices I have.



The Career Doctor responds:
Besides teaching the ideas for careers that use math and/or the critical skills of math that
immediately come to mind are mathematician engineer statistician economist cryptographer accountant market researcher business analyst actuary and computer technician/programmer.
As you’ve probably already discovered people who are good at math have a number of very
useful (and transferable) skills that can be used in a variety of careers. Some of these skills
include: number-crunching problem-solving critical-thinking and observation interpreting and analyzing situations and information logical/rational thinking and organizational skills.
The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
Report on Mathematics in Industry found that the
most important traits of nonacademic mathematicians in finding jobs are:

  • Problem-solving — skills in formulating modeling and solving problems from diverse and changing areas.
  • Flexibility — interest in knowledge of and flexibility across applications.
  • Computation — knowledge of and experience with computation.
  • Communication — communication skills spoken and written.
  • Teamwork — adeptness at working with colleagues in group situations.

Take the time to research various occupations and careers that use math skills. Talk to
your math professors. Go to the career center at your college and meet with a counselor.
Go to the library (or online) and use resources such as the U.S. Department of Labor’s
Occupational
Outlook Handbook
.
One final resource that I thought would be especially interesting to you is the
Association for Women in Mathematics.
You’ll find lots of great resources for women who are considering careers in math.
Find more career exploration resources in this section of Quintessential Careers:
Career Exploration Resources.


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