Should She Take a Second Job?


Lindsey writes:
Hi. I am considering the idea of taking a second job on top of my regular full-time job.
I see it as a chance to pay off some debt and get back on my feet while helping my
family. I have excellent skills so I am not so worried about difficulty in finding a job
but I am worried about the effects of so much work on me and on my family life.
Any thoughts?



The Career Doctor responds:
Somewhere between 7-8 million Americans hold a second or third job…
and most do so to simply earn a living or to help earn extra money.
Moonlighting is tough — it’s hardest on you (because you will
have no free time) and your family and friends (because they
will never see you).
Here are some strategies for finding and surviving a second job:

  1. Check your main employer’s policies. Before you even consider
    looking for a second job take the time to check your current employer’s
    policies about holding outside employment.

  2. Understand your reasons for taking a second job. If it’s purely
    monetary you may be able to talk to your current employer to pick
    up extra shifts rather than take a second job.

  3. Consider a trial basis. Moonlighting in short doses — to accomplish
    some short-term goals — usually works better than working multiple jobs
    for long stretches of time.

  4. Find a job that interests you. Perhaps you have a boring office job
    as your main job so try something fun like being a tour guide or other
    more unusual job for your second one.

  5. Consider second jobs that are less stressful. If your first job is a
    pressure-cooker find a second one that is relaxing to you such as
    pet-sitting or tutoring.

  6. Find jobs that are geographically close to each other- – or to your
    home. Your time will be limited enough without adding a long commute
    to your second job.

  7. Seek out new opportunities with new employers. If you are contemplating
    a career change but are not sure of your next career use second jobs to test
    out some of your career ideas.

  8. Reduce your load. If you are working multiple jobs it’s probably time to
    cut some of those extracurricular activities.

  9. Carve out time for significant others. You must find a way to schedule some
    time with your family and friends or those relationships will suffer… and if you have
    a partner be sure s/he is okay with your plans.

  10. Know when it’s time to quit. Whether it’s when you reach your financial goal
    or when you are beginning to mentally or physically breakdown you must r
    educe your load… though that does not necessarily mean quitting your
    second job (if it has become your new career passion).

Read more in my latest article published on Quintessential Careers:
Moonlighting
in America: Strategies for Managing Working Multiple Jobs

See also this section of Quintessential Careers:
Jobs
for Consultants Freelancers and Gurus

;

Lindsey writes:
Hi. I am considering the idea of taking a second job on top of my regular full-time job.
I see it as a chance to pay off some debt and get back on my feet while helping my
family. I have excellent skills so I am not so worried about difficulty in finding a job
but I am worried about the effects of so much work on me and on my family life.
Any thoughts?



The Career Doctor responds:
Somewhere between 7-8 million Americans hold a second or third job…
and most do so to simply earn a living or to help earn extra money.
Moonlighting is tough — it’s hardest on you (because you will
have no free time) and your family and friends (because they
will never see you).
Here are some strategies for finding and surviving a second job:

  1. Check your main employer’s policies. Before you even consider
    looking for a second job take the time to check your current employer’s
    policies about holding outside employment.

  2. Understand your reasons for taking a second job. If it’s purely
    monetary you may be able to talk to your current employer to pick
    up extra shifts rather than take a second job.

  3. Consider a trial basis. Moonlighting in short doses — to accomplish
    some short-term goals — usually works better than working multiple jobs
    for long stretches of time.

  4. Find a job that interests you. Perhaps you have a boring office job
    as your main job so try something fun like being a tour guide or other
    more unusual job for your second one.

  5. Consider second jobs that are less stressful. If your first job is a
    pressure-cooker find a second one that is relaxing to you such as
    pet-sitting or tutoring.

  6. Find jobs that are geographically close to each other- – or to your
    home. Your time will be limited enough without adding a long commute
    to your second job.

  7. Seek out new opportunities with new employers. If you are contemplating
    a career change but are not sure of your next career use second jobs to test
    out some of your career ideas.

  8. Reduce your load. If you are working multiple jobs it’s probably time to
    cut some of those extracurricular activities.

  9. Carve out time for significant others. You must find a way to schedule some
    time with your family and friends or those relationships will suffer… and if you have
    a partner be sure s/he is okay with your plans.

  10. Know when it’s time to quit. Whether it’s when you reach your financial goal
    or when you are beginning to mentally or physically breakdown you must r
    educe your load… though that does not necessarily mean quitting your
    second job (if it has become your new career passion).

Read more in my latest article published on Quintessential Careers:
Moonlighting
in America: Strategies for Managing Working Multiple Jobs

See also this section of Quintessential Careers:
Jobs
for Consultants Freelancers and Gurus


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