Should Assessments Be Used in Hiring Decisions?


Chris writes:
I just finished reading an article you wrote regarding interview preparation.
You briefly mentioned potential employers using assessments testing for
personality and skills to help in their hiring decisions.
I am curious to hear your honest opinion on the subject of assessments which
attempt to measure potential — assessments that are supposed to be able to
predict a candidate’s job performance and potential for growth and advancement.


The Career Doctor responds:
Let me first state that I am a strong believe in using career assessment
tests as a personal tool for career development and career direction.
And I think there is some value to assessments that employers use to
measure skills vital to a job — typing tests for secretarial positions — but I
am really against tests that demean job-seekers especially low-wage
job-seekers.
I am on the fence about personality tests. I remember one discussion
with an employer that used personality tests almost exclusively to decide
whether prospective job-seekers would “fit” the organization. The top management
was convinced that only a certain personality type would succeed in their
company and they only hired people who matched that profile.
In an era of diversity — however we define diversity — I think having employees
of all personality types could only add to the creativity and decision-making
of organizations.
As for tests that supposedly measure things like honesty and morality or
future job performance I say get rid of them. They are a liability to using people
skills to evaluate prospective employees and I do not support their use at all.

;

Chris writes:
I just finished reading an article you wrote regarding interview preparation.
You briefly mentioned potential employers using assessments testing for
personality and skills to help in their hiring decisions.
I am curious to hear your honest opinion on the subject of assessments which
attempt to measure potential — assessments that are supposed to be able to
predict a candidate’s job performance and potential for growth and advancement.


The Career Doctor responds:
Let me first state that I am a strong believe in using career assessment
tests as a personal tool for career development and career direction.
And I think there is some value to assessments that employers use to
measure skills vital to a job — typing tests for secretarial positions — but I
am really against tests that demean job-seekers especially low-wage
job-seekers.
I am on the fence about personality tests. I remember one discussion
with an employer that used personality tests almost exclusively to decide
whether prospective job-seekers would “fit” the organization. The top management
was convinced that only a certain personality type would succeed in their
company and they only hired people who matched that profile.
In an era of diversity — however we define diversity — I think having employees
of all personality types could only add to the creativity and decision-making
of organizations.
As for tests that supposedly measure things like honesty and morality or
future job performance I say get rid of them. They are a liability to using people
skills to evaluate prospective employees and I do not support their use at all.


customerservice@livecareer.com
800-652-8430 Mon- Fri 8am - 8pm CST
Sat 8am - 5pm CST, Sun 10am - 6pm CST