Preparation for Career as an Editor?


May writes:
Firstly I’d like to thank you on such a beneficial service; I’m sure it
has been very useful to college students/graduates like myself. Secondly I have a
careers question I’d like to ask you. I am very interested in becoming a newspaper
or magazine editor. What kind of qualifications would I need? And would I have to
major/minor in a certain subject in college in order to qualify? How competitive is it?
Would I be able to take on this job while I am still in college? (I am currently a
sophomore studying business administration — marketing and management). I
would really appreciate it if you can provide me with some information on how I
might go about taking this career path. Thank you for your time and help and I
look forward to hearing from you.



The Career Doctor responds:
One of the keys to being a successful journalist is having a passion and interest
for a particular subject; another key is possessing the ability to clearly communicate
ideas and information.
Newspaper and magazine editors begin their careers as journalists and writers so if
you are interested in this field start as a reporter or writer. You can start
while in college by joining the staff of your school’s campus newspaper. You could
also seek out part-time positions with media outlets as well as focus your energies
on finding one or more journalism internships.
While you do not need to be a journalism major to have a career in the field it
certainly is important to have a background (and strength) in communications and
writing. Some journalists are hired because they are not only good writers but have
expertise in a certain subject area.
Print journalism is a tough field to enter especially ow as newspapers are struggling. Most job-seekers fresh out of college — unless
they graduate with a lot of experience — have to start in entry-level positions on the
staffs of small newspapers or magazines. Once you’ve built a reputation (and a
solid collection of clips) you can move to larger media organizations and/or up the career ladder.
If your college has a journalism school or program go talk to one or more of the professors
and seek their advice and suggestions for achieving your goal. You could also consider
going to your college’s career services office and conducting several informational
interviews with current journalists and editors. Learn more in the Quintessential Careers
Informational Interviewing Tutorial.
You can get further information by using these career and job resources:

;

May writes:
Firstly I’d like to thank you on such a beneficial service; I’m sure it
has been very useful to college students/graduates like myself. Secondly I have a
careers question I’d like to ask you. I am very interested in becoming a newspaper
or magazine editor. What kind of qualifications would I need? And would I have to
major/minor in a certain subject in college in order to qualify? How competitive is it?
Would I be able to take on this job while I am still in college? (I am currently a
sophomore studying business administration — marketing and management). I
would really appreciate it if you can provide me with some information on how I
might go about taking this career path. Thank you for your time and help and I
look forward to hearing from you.



The Career Doctor responds:
One of the keys to being a successful journalist is having a passion and interest
for a particular subject; another key is possessing the ability to clearly communicate
ideas and information.
Newspaper and magazine editors begin their careers as journalists and writers so if
you are interested in this field start as a reporter or writer. You can start
while in college by joining the staff of your school’s campus newspaper. You could
also seek out part-time positions with media outlets as well as focus your energies
on finding one or more journalism internships.
While you do not need to be a journalism major to have a career in the field it
certainly is important to have a background (and strength) in communications and
writing. Some journalists are hired because they are not only good writers but have
expertise in a certain subject area.
Print journalism is a tough field to enter especially ow as newspapers are struggling. Most job-seekers fresh out of college — unless
they graduate with a lot of experience — have to start in entry-level positions on the
staffs of small newspapers or magazines. Once you’ve built a reputation (and a
solid collection of clips) you can move to larger media organizations and/or up the career ladder.
If your college has a journalism school or program go talk to one or more of the professors
and seek their advice and suggestions for achieving your goal. You could also consider
going to your college’s career services office and conducting several informational
interviews with current journalists and editors. Learn more in the Quintessential Careers
Informational Interviewing Tutorial.
You can get further information by using these career and job resources:


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