How to Organize a CV


Diane writes:
I am currently preparing an educational CV. I see your outline on the website.
Do I label each area and then add my personal data? I’m really confused on
how the layout should be and my CV is due this week. I appreciate any help
you may render.


The Career Doctor responds:
In the U.S. the curriculum vitae — often called a CV or vita — tends to be used
more for scientific and teaching positions than a resume. In other parts of the
world a CV is more common than a resume.
The key thing to remember are the similarities between a resume and a CV –
both have similar purposes — as marketing documents that provide key information
about your skills experiences education and personal qualities that show you as
the ideal candidate. Where a resume and a curriculum vitae differ is their use
format and length. CVs typically have additional categories and are not limited
to a certain number of pages.
The typical academic vita has most of these categories/headings:

  • Personal/Contact Information
  • Academic Background
  • Professional Licenses/Certifications
  • Academic/Teaching Experience
  • Technical and Specialized Skills
  • Related/Other Experience
  • Professional/Academic Honors and Awards
  • Professional Development
  • Research/Scholarly Activities
  • Grants
  • Service
  • Academic/Research Interests
  • Affiliations/Memberships
  • Foreign Language Abilities/Skills
  • Consulting
  • Volunteer Work
  • References

As with resumes do not include personal information (age marital
status etc.) photos salary information and the like.
And as with all job-search documents it’s best not only to carefully edit and
proofread your CV but because vitas vary by profession and discipline I would
also ask a trusted colleague or mentor to review and critique it for you.
Read more – and see some samples — in my article
Preparing a
Curriculum Vitae (CV)
published on Quintessential Careers.

;

Diane writes:
I am currently preparing an educational CV. I see your outline on the website.
Do I label each area and then add my personal data? I’m really confused on
how the layout should be and my CV is due this week. I appreciate any help
you may render.


The Career Doctor responds:
In the U.S. the curriculum vitae — often called a CV or vita — tends to be used
more for scientific and teaching positions than a resume. In other parts of the
world a CV is more common than a resume.
The key thing to remember are the similarities between a resume and a CV –
both have similar purposes — as marketing documents that provide key information
about your skills experiences education and personal qualities that show you as
the ideal candidate. Where a resume and a curriculum vitae differ is their use
format and length. CVs typically have additional categories and are not limited
to a certain number of pages.
The typical academic vita has most of these categories/headings:

  • Personal/Contact Information
  • Academic Background
  • Professional Licenses/Certifications
  • Academic/Teaching Experience
  • Technical and Specialized Skills
  • Related/Other Experience
  • Professional/Academic Honors and Awards
  • Professional Development
  • Research/Scholarly Activities
  • Grants
  • Service
  • Academic/Research Interests
  • Affiliations/Memberships
  • Foreign Language Abilities/Skills
  • Consulting
  • Volunteer Work
  • References

As with resumes do not include personal information (age marital
status etc.) photos salary information and the like.
And as with all job-search documents it’s best not only to carefully edit and
proofread your CV but because vitas vary by profession and discipline I would
also ask a trusted colleague or mentor to review and critique it for you.
Read more – and see some samples — in my article
Preparing a
Curriculum Vitae (CV)
published on Quintessential Careers.


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