He’s Lost When It Comes to Career


Mike writes:
I am a 26-year-old male college graduate who majored in sociology with a
minor in business and communications. As I have found out jobs in this
major are scarce without further education and frankly I do not have the time
or resources to go back to school. I am currently working in a retail sporting-goods job that I dislike. My heart is telling me to pursue something that truly
makes me happy instead of working for corporate money-hungry executives.
I really want to pursue an environmental job but without a major in biology
or a related field this seems impossible. Please I am lost. What can I do?



The Career Doctor responds:
You’ve taken the first small step of a potentially long process. You realize that
retail is not for you and it’s time to make a change. Excellent. And ideally
we should all be working in an area where we have a passion — something we
really enjoy doing every day. Unfortunately as you have found many people are
not working in those ideal jobs/careers.
To help avoid another mistake let me first have you analyze why you are
looking at an environmental career. I actually want you to start back six
years ago and examine why you chose your major and minors. You know
you don’t ever want to do retail again but now examine your interests and
passions. What interests you about an environmental career? What kind of
research have you done? What kind of further education or skills do you
need to acquire for the type of job you are seeking? Can you combine your
interest in the environment with your educational background and skills?
Besides conducting research online or in your local library I would suggest
you conduct some informational interviews with local (or national) environmental
professionals. Contact your college’s career and alumni offices to find alums
who have environmental jobs. Informational interviews are great ways to build
a network of contacts in a new career field to learn more about a specific
career and to gain valuable information about the training education and
skills required. And don’t forget about volunteering as a way of breaking into a
new career field.
Depending upon the types of jobs you are seeking you may need to go
back to school. Changing careers is never easy but with the proper planning
and research you can do it.
Please read my article The
10-Step Plan to Career Change
which should help get you focused on what you need to do.
There are also quite a few good environmental career and job sites on the Web such
as the Environmental Careers Organization and Cyber-Sierra’s Natural Resources Job
Search. You can find descriptions and links to these and others in our
Jobs in Agriculture
Zoology and the Environment
section of Quintessential Careers.

;

Mike writes:
I am a 26-year-old male college graduate who majored in sociology with a
minor in business and communications. As I have found out jobs in this
major are scarce without further education and frankly I do not have the time
or resources to go back to school. I am currently working in a retail sporting-goods job that I dislike. My heart is telling me to pursue something that truly
makes me happy instead of working for corporate money-hungry executives.
I really want to pursue an environmental job but without a major in biology
or a related field this seems impossible. Please I am lost. What can I do?



The Career Doctor responds:
You’ve taken the first small step of a potentially long process. You realize that
retail is not for you and it’s time to make a change. Excellent. And ideally
we should all be working in an area where we have a passion — something we
really enjoy doing every day. Unfortunately as you have found many people are
not working in those ideal jobs/careers.
To help avoid another mistake let me first have you analyze why you are
looking at an environmental career. I actually want you to start back six
years ago and examine why you chose your major and minors. You know
you don’t ever want to do retail again but now examine your interests and
passions. What interests you about an environmental career? What kind of
research have you done? What kind of further education or skills do you
need to acquire for the type of job you are seeking? Can you combine your
interest in the environment with your educational background and skills?
Besides conducting research online or in your local library I would suggest
you conduct some informational interviews with local (or national) environmental
professionals. Contact your college’s career and alumni offices to find alums
who have environmental jobs. Informational interviews are great ways to build
a network of contacts in a new career field to learn more about a specific
career and to gain valuable information about the training education and
skills required. And don’t forget about volunteering as a way of breaking into a
new career field.
Depending upon the types of jobs you are seeking you may need to go
back to school. Changing careers is never easy but with the proper planning
and research you can do it.
Please read my article The
10-Step Plan to Career Change
which should help get you focused on what you need to do.
There are also quite a few good environmental career and job sites on the Web such
as the Environmental Careers Organization and Cyber-Sierra’s Natural Resources Job
Search. You can find descriptions and links to these and others in our
Jobs in Agriculture
Zoology and the Environment
section of Quintessential Careers.


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