Followup Calls Still Applicable in Today’s Job Search?


Rob writes:
I’ve found your website to be an incredibly helpful resource. I’m a
systems administrator laid off — and still searching to find a job a year later.
Your site repeatedly urges job-seekers to call companies and ask for
interviews and to make commitments to do so in cover letters. Does this
advice still apply in today’s technical job market?
Aside from the large number of ads that clearly state “no calls” I’m finding
that most employers in my profession make it difficult or impossible to
ascertain contact information. Some companies don’t even list a phone
number or address on their web site meaning that more serious detective
work is needed to make contact. When one does make the call the
response seems to always be a variation on “don’t call us we’ll call you.”
If you could address this situation on your site I think it’d be most helpful
to job-seekers in my position. Thanks for your attention and the
wonderful web site.



The Career Doctor responds:
The bottom line is this: yes technology and the current job market make it
even easier for employers to toss all etiquette aside. Employers do not even
need to bother to acknowledge job-seekers. The better companies of course
still do…but their numbers are small.
When we say it’s important to follow-up we mean to follow-up. Employers
often say “no phone calls” because they don’t want hundreds/thousands of
people calling them to apply for the job. That wording does not mean
however that a week or so after you have applied that you cannot follow-up
to be sure they have received your application. “No calls” is only for the initial
contact not follow-up.
Of course the best solution is to have a network contact within the company
who can feed you information and help make your case for an interview…and
that’s more and more where job-seeking has to go. Building contacts through
professional organizations to provide you with more information about potential
openings as well as more company information and inside details that can
improve your chances for getting an interview and job offer.
You still need to be politely aggressive in this job market. You need to find
a way to break through barriers and make yourself known above the simple
database searches of keywords that many companies are indeed using –
especially technology companies.
Fearing being too aggressive or seen as impolite and not following up ALL
your job leads is simply bad job-hunting.
We also have an article on Quintessential Careers
10 Reality
Checks of Job-Hunting
…and follow-up actually is so important it is two of the 10!

;

Rob writes:
I’ve found your website to be an incredibly helpful resource. I’m a
systems administrator laid off — and still searching to find a job a year later.
Your site repeatedly urges job-seekers to call companies and ask for
interviews and to make commitments to do so in cover letters. Does this
advice still apply in today’s technical job market?
Aside from the large number of ads that clearly state “no calls” I’m finding
that most employers in my profession make it difficult or impossible to
ascertain contact information. Some companies don’t even list a phone
number or address on their web site meaning that more serious detective
work is needed to make contact. When one does make the call the
response seems to always be a variation on “don’t call us we’ll call you.”
If you could address this situation on your site I think it’d be most helpful
to job-seekers in my position. Thanks for your attention and the
wonderful web site.



The Career Doctor responds:
The bottom line is this: yes technology and the current job market make it
even easier for employers to toss all etiquette aside. Employers do not even
need to bother to acknowledge job-seekers. The better companies of course
still do…but their numbers are small.
When we say it’s important to follow-up we mean to follow-up. Employers
often say “no phone calls” because they don’t want hundreds/thousands of
people calling them to apply for the job. That wording does not mean
however that a week or so after you have applied that you cannot follow-up
to be sure they have received your application. “No calls” is only for the initial
contact not follow-up.
Of course the best solution is to have a network contact within the company
who can feed you information and help make your case for an interview…and
that’s more and more where job-seeking has to go. Building contacts through
professional organizations to provide you with more information about potential
openings as well as more company information and inside details that can
improve your chances for getting an interview and job offer.
You still need to be politely aggressive in this job market. You need to find
a way to break through barriers and make yourself known above the simple
database searches of keywords that many companies are indeed using –
especially technology companies.
Fearing being too aggressive or seen as impolite and not following up ALL
your job leads is simply bad job-hunting.
We also have an article on Quintessential Careers
10 Reality
Checks of Job-Hunting
…and follow-up actually is so important it is two of the 10!


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