Disability Dictates Career Change


B.J. writes:
I’m a 47-year-old dental hygienist. I am being treated for severe carpal tunnel
problems and am currently awaiting my second surgery. I am really at a loss
as to what to do with the rest of my life. I will not be able to do dental hygiene
at all. I really don’t even know where to start as I have been doing this for 22
years and I am not trained for anything else. Any suggestions would be appreciated.



The Career Doctor responds:
First let me say how sorry I am about your health problems. I hope your
surgery exceeds your expectations.
Many baby boomers are finding themselves in your same situation hitting
their late 40′s and realizing that they are seeking something more in their
lives — and from their careers. It’s both a scary and exciting time in your life
to be thinking about starting a new career.
But let me assure you — and all those other baby boomers — that as long
as you take the process slowly allowing yourself time to recharge reflect
and research you should be fine. You may face some tough times — both
financially and mentally — and you may want to seek the help of a career counselor or career coach — but I am confident you will find a direction for
the rest of your life.
There are a couple of places for you to start. You could start with why you
chose to be a dental hygienist — and the aspects of the job you really love.
Or you can make a complete separation from your past and simply focus
on the things you most enjoy. Make a list of the activities and skills you
most enjoy. What types of things energize you?
Once you’ve developed such a list you can begin researching new occupations
that use those skills. And once you’ve gathered information on various new
careers take the time to explore each at a deeper level perhaps even
conduct a few informational interviews with people who work in those fields.
Next develop a strategy for breaking into that field. You will probably need
to get additional education/training or work experience — or both. Build your
network in your new field. Join professional organizations. Learn all the latest
techniques of the best job-seekers.
Good luck!
You can find lots of career change resources
including helpful articles and quizzes by going to this section of Quintessential Careers: Job
& Career Resources for Career Changers
.

;

B.J. writes:
I’m a 47-year-old dental hygienist. I am being treated for severe carpal tunnel
problems and am currently awaiting my second surgery. I am really at a loss
as to what to do with the rest of my life. I will not be able to do dental hygiene
at all. I really don’t even know where to start as I have been doing this for 22
years and I am not trained for anything else. Any suggestions would be appreciated.



The Career Doctor responds:
First let me say how sorry I am about your health problems. I hope your
surgery exceeds your expectations.
Many baby boomers are finding themselves in your same situation hitting
their late 40′s and realizing that they are seeking something more in their
lives — and from their careers. It’s both a scary and exciting time in your life
to be thinking about starting a new career.
But let me assure you — and all those other baby boomers — that as long
as you take the process slowly allowing yourself time to recharge reflect
and research you should be fine. You may face some tough times — both
financially and mentally — and you may want to seek the help of a career counselor or career coach — but I am confident you will find a direction for
the rest of your life.
There are a couple of places for you to start. You could start with why you
chose to be a dental hygienist — and the aspects of the job you really love.
Or you can make a complete separation from your past and simply focus
on the things you most enjoy. Make a list of the activities and skills you
most enjoy. What types of things energize you?
Once you’ve developed such a list you can begin researching new occupations
that use those skills. And once you’ve gathered information on various new
careers take the time to explore each at a deeper level perhaps even
conduct a few informational interviews with people who work in those fields.
Next develop a strategy for breaking into that field. You will probably need
to get additional education/training or work experience — or both. Build your
network in your new field. Join professional organizations. Learn all the latest
techniques of the best job-seekers.
Good luck!
You can find lots of career change resources
including helpful articles and quizzes by going to this section of Quintessential Careers: Job
& Career Resources for Career Changers
.


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