Damage Control After Flawed Phone Interview


Darby writes:
I just had an over-the-phone job interview with a children’s museum this morning.
I felt the interview did not go as well as I would have liked. The interviewer was
rather rigid and I felt the questions he asked did not probe into my strong points
very well. I have a feeling they may be “using” me to show they are looking for a
candidate “far and wide” when in reality I do know they have people from within
that are applying for the job. I would like to make a trip up to the museum to look
around and also to prove my sincerity. 1) But am I wasting my time? (It would
be a 6-hour drive each way; I’d have to take off work etc.)
I am going to send a “thank you for the interview” email and 2) what can I do to
emphasize my competency in the area of management at that time? I am pretty
sure the interviewer and I did not get into sync in that matter. (I had just had
another interview with another employer that did not focus as much on
management skills [more about ME] and it was more off-the-cuff. I was offered the
job but the logistics of relocating there weren’t ideal so I turned it down. I think
I was drawing too much from that interview during the recent children’s museum
one.)



The Career Doctor responds:
First you have to remember that most people are not good interviewers. Add
interviewing over the phone and the number declines even more. So don’t
sweat it too much. Plus often times the weaker interviews (in our minds) turn
into something while interviews where we feel like we excelled end up dead-ends.
Do write a thank-you letter highlighting all the ways you are perfect for the job.
If you know the qualifications you could even write a two-column letter where
the left column lists the qualifications and the right column lists what you offer.
If you do brainstorm even more ideas send it along as a supplemental sheet –
“Darby’s Ideas for the Children’s Museum.”
I wouldn’t jump in my car just yet but in the thank-you letter you can make
the offer — and then in a follow-up phone call next week you can mention your
strong interest in the position and the possibility you may be in the area…and
then judge the reaction. If it sounds insincere perhaps they are just going
through the motions with you but if they sound interested in you stopping by –
and this is a job that really interests you — then see if you can arrange to
“drop by.”
Damage control is not negative; interviews are just going to be awkward at times…
and there are going to be situations where you feel you need to emphasize your
talents in writing…
Keep at it — and keep at other opportunities as well.
Read more about thank-you letters in this article published on Quintessential Careers: FAQs
About Thank You Letters
.
And for dealing with any future phone interviews check out this article on Quintessential
Careers: Proper
Phone Interview Etiquette Can Propel You to the Next Step in the Hiring Process
.

;

Darby writes:
I just had an over-the-phone job interview with a children’s museum this morning.
I felt the interview did not go as well as I would have liked. The interviewer was
rather rigid and I felt the questions he asked did not probe into my strong points
very well. I have a feeling they may be “using” me to show they are looking for a
candidate “far and wide” when in reality I do know they have people from within
that are applying for the job. I would like to make a trip up to the museum to look
around and also to prove my sincerity. 1) But am I wasting my time? (It would
be a 6-hour drive each way; I’d have to take off work etc.)
I am going to send a “thank you for the interview” email and 2) what can I do to
emphasize my competency in the area of management at that time? I am pretty
sure the interviewer and I did not get into sync in that matter. (I had just had
another interview with another employer that did not focus as much on
management skills [more about ME] and it was more off-the-cuff. I was offered the
job but the logistics of relocating there weren’t ideal so I turned it down. I think
I was drawing too much from that interview during the recent children’s museum
one.)



The Career Doctor responds:
First you have to remember that most people are not good interviewers. Add
interviewing over the phone and the number declines even more. So don’t
sweat it too much. Plus often times the weaker interviews (in our minds) turn
into something while interviews where we feel like we excelled end up dead-ends.
Do write a thank-you letter highlighting all the ways you are perfect for the job.
If you know the qualifications you could even write a two-column letter where
the left column lists the qualifications and the right column lists what you offer.
If you do brainstorm even more ideas send it along as a supplemental sheet –
“Darby’s Ideas for the Children’s Museum.”
I wouldn’t jump in my car just yet but in the thank-you letter you can make
the offer — and then in a follow-up phone call next week you can mention your
strong interest in the position and the possibility you may be in the area…and
then judge the reaction. If it sounds insincere perhaps they are just going
through the motions with you but if they sound interested in you stopping by –
and this is a job that really interests you — then see if you can arrange to
“drop by.”
Damage control is not negative; interviews are just going to be awkward at times…
and there are going to be situations where you feel you need to emphasize your
talents in writing…
Keep at it — and keep at other opportunities as well.
Read more about thank-you letters in this article published on Quintessential Careers: FAQs
About Thank You Letters
.
And for dealing with any future phone interviews check out this article on Quintessential
Careers: Proper
Phone Interview Etiquette Can Propel You to the Next Step in the Hiring Process
.


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