Jobs in Birmingham, AL

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 8,024 Jobs Available
  • 212,247 Population
  • $52,000 Average Salary
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Birmingham Jobs At A Glance

Birmingham At A Glance

Formerly an industrial hub, Birmingham is in the midst of an economic turnaround. The city has become attractive to the young and educated drawn by the South's booming businesses and low cost of living. Both Kiplinger and Forbes have named the city one of the most affordable metropolitan areas in the country.Between tornado cookies and GoKickball, the good people of Birmingham get up and go to work. A small population is looking for work. For them (and anyone else interested), here's an overview of the job market and salaries.

Job Market in Birmingham

Job Market in Birmingham

Birmingham's economic stability is driven by a growing automotive assembly sector that surrounds the area. You can find Mercedes, Hyundai, Nissan and Honda as close as Smyrna and Montgomery. Other contributing industries are medicine, research, finance, banking and technology. Steel production is still a major player.The city is fighting an uphill battle with its unemployment rate. It currently sits at 5.9%. This is a drop from a year ago, when it was 6.4% but higher than the national 5.2% average. The city managed to add 3,000 jobs in 2014 and outpaced most of its neighbors in GDP growth. Quarterly census of employment and wage surveys have average weekly wages in the area at $1,003, slightly lower than the national average, which rests at $1,048. The county of Jefferson is at the high end with an average of $1,066 and Blount is at the low with $613.Top professions in the area include engineers, financial services, leisure and hospitality, construction and government.

Resume Tips For Birmingham Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Birmingham Jobseekers

Hiring managers are going to scan your resume, looking for a reason to give it a closer look. Here are five ways to give them a reason.

  1. Include links to professional profiles, blogs and other relevant material. Savvy hiring managers are going to research you anyway. You might as well hedge your bets by directing them to what you'd prefer they find.
  2. Effectively brand yourself by using a consistent name across your resumes and online profiles. This will be especially important to ensure hiring managers don't end up looking at the wrong person.
  3. Use a single phone number. Don't include a landline and a cell. Use the one you're most likely to answer. The same should be said for an email address. Create an account with a professional sounding name.
  4. Use strong keywords and phrasing like "strategic planner" and "forecasting. " Use common terminology without getting too obscure or technical.
  5. Avoid dense blocks of text and stick to no more than six bullets per job. Put them in order of relevance. Lead with accomplishments and achievements. Only get into regular tasks if you have less than four bullets, especially with recent jobs.

How to Find Jobs in Birmingham

How to Find Jobs in Birmingham

Finding a job can be daunting. You may have to be a little original in your strategies. Here are five true stories about candidates who took their job searches into creative, successful directions.

  1. When networking, have your 15 to 30 second "elevator pitch. " Include a recent project or accomplishment. Prepare business cards with contact information, links and the position you want. Always follow up via email or phone. One candidate used this approach to get their HR and payroll benefits coordinator spot.
  2. Check out your alma mater's website for career services and network through alumni associations. If possible, visit the campus with a resume and other pertinent materials to hand out. A candidate using this method found a Director of Internet Marketing and Sales position.
  3. One candidate used Facebook to post ads for their dream job. Ads were targeted at specific companies and individuals whose profiles listed those companies. The campaign led to a job at a boutique publishing house.
  4. One candidate joined a career-transition group. The connection provided moral support and helped set up an action plan. One of the group's leaders eventually recommended the candidate, who was hired as a human resources generalist at a women's medical device company.
  5. One candidate who needed a career change volunteered at a nonprofit that partnered female mentors with teenage girls. Management was impressed and offered them a program manager's position.